Is the selfie going to change credit union card security?

first_img 28SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Selfie lovers rejoice! It’s the dawn of a new day, at least technologically speaking. Today MasterCard announced it is set to begin testing a verification method that would allow card holders to verify online purchases with a selfie.The app will require card holders to take a picture of themselves each time they make a purchase. Additionally, MasterCard is also testing fingerprint and voice recognition methods for verification. This new method of payment follows what MasterCard has developed for card holders in the past. Just last year MasterCard rolled out contactless technology, which we are all very familiar with, enabling card holders to activate cards through their smartphones and make purchases using contactless (NFC) point-of-sale terminals.This is another sign that the card brand is trying to get ahead of Apple, who added hardened security to their offerings by adding a fingerprint scanner to passbook back in 2013. MasterCard employees will roll out the technology for testing through October of this year and it is compatible with every major smartphone brand. MasterCard’s thinking? Taking a selfie is easier than remembering a password… continue reading »last_img read more

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Former Orangeman McNabb retires as a Philadelphia Eagle, promises to spend more time around Syracuse

first_img Published on July 29, 2013 at 3:18 pm Contact Allie: [email protected] It started with a coincidence.Interview season for the Philadelphia Eagles – mid-late 90s – and team owner Jeffrey Lurie was making his rounds, scouting for potential additions to his team.He had a second cousin that he didn’t know too well. This cousin’s husband was Paul Pasqualoni, then-head coach of the Syracuse football team, who evidently helped Lurie familiarize himself with Donovan McNabb.And it wasn’t long before Lurie saw that McNabb had a real “sense of stability.”Fourteen years, four NFC championship game appearances, two years away from the Eagles and a further two in quasi-retirement later, Lurie had many more positive things to say about McNabb at the 36-year-old’s retirement press conference.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“[He is a] franchise-changing quarterback, and those words are not spoken very often,” Lurie said.McNabb was the Eagles’ first draft pick in 1999, and was a starter for the Eagles for 11 years. His jersey will be retired by the team in mid-September.Monday was a, “special day, special day” McNabb said.McNabb, who finished his Syracuse career in 1998, fought back tears as former Eagles teammates Brian Dawkins and Brian Westbrook spoke of lessons learned and memories shared throughout a decade of playing with the six-time Pro Bowler.Westbrook said he and McNabb shared a lot on and off the field, and they were, and are, “best friends around the game” – a “duo in sports.”Dawkins spoke of the days “before ‘5’ got here,” and described McNabb as a leader.“It was a pleasure going to war with you,” he concluded, before a long, over-the-shoulder hug with McNabb.McNabb hasn’t played in the NFL since 2011. He holds many of the Eagles franchise records, with numbers like 216 touchdown passes and 32,873 passing yards.Lurie described Monday morning as a time to honor the greatest player in the history of the Eagles.“I just can’t say enough about No. 5,” Lurie said. “Tough? There’s never been a player tougher.”When McNabb took the podium, he spoke of the love he has for his parents, for always motivating, challenging and driving him in life, and of the love he has for his college-sweetheart wife, Roxie, and their four children.“What you do on the field or on the court does not make you a great role model. It’s the decisions that you make away from your place of business, and when no one is looking,” he said.He spoke of the appreciation he has for his teammates and their sacrifice, passion and resolve throughout his tenure in Philadelphia.McNabb attributes a lot of his success as a professional football player to his time spent on the turf at the Carrier Dome.“My time at Syracuse prepared me for everything here,” McNabb said.He spoke of how privileged he was to have the opportunity to learn from former SU coaches Kevin Rogers and Pasqualoni. He described Rogers as “sort of like my father in the New York area.”“Kevin Rogers prepared me for each and every time as a quarterback in this league,” McNabb said.McNabb said that he plans to “be around” Syracuse, where he led the Orangemen to a 35-14 record, more frequently, and plans to get more involved in the community. The University will retire his jersey in November.Said McNabb: “If you want to be great, make the man next to you greater.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Solar Eclipses Unique to Earth, SETI Researcher “Finds”

first_imgLike many before him, Seth Shostak pondered the significance of total solar eclipses for the one planet with observers to appreciate them.  “OK, I’ve done the math,” the SETI Institute director said for SETI Thursday on Space.com.  “What you always suspected might be true … is true: namely that the best place in the solar system to see a total solar eclipse is Earth.”    Shostak appeared briefly in the intelligent-design film The Privileged Planet, which makes a case that the universe and earth are designed for discovery, not only for habitability.  An evolutionist, Shostak was not promoting the premise of the film, but merely pointing out that unless the the earth were very special – miraculous almost – we should expect that other beings like us would inhabit the universe.  Shostak subsequently tried to differentiate the work of SETI from that of intelligent design, however (see 12/03/2005) – a comparison made in another Illustra film, Unlocking the Mystery of Life.  Undoubtedly he has been dogged by questions from listeners about how SETI differs from the principles of design detection promoted by I.D.    In this article on solar eclipses, however, Shostak’s own research arrived at two similar conclusions stated in the film: (1) solar eclipses have allowed humans to make significant scientific discoveries, such as the detection of helium and confirmation of Einstein’s theory of relativity, and (2) the presence of a moon like ours able to produce eclipses is probably linked to the hability of our planet.  “If tides really do encourage life, then worlds with tides similar to ours are also likely to enjoy total eclipses,” he conjectured.  “Maybe eclipse chasers are a common cosmic breed.”He came to the same conclusions because the conclusions are scientifically reasonable and based on observational facts.  What is shameful is that Shostak gave no credit for prior research done more thoroughly on this question by Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Richards in the book The Privileged Planet.  He pretends as if he were the first to think of these things.  He obviously knows that he appears in the film, and undoubtedly has watched it and understands its notoriety in the mainstream scientific community.  So we challenge Seth Shostak to come forward and admit that he got his best ideas (that design detection is a scientifically valid reasoning process, and that the earth is designed for discovery) from his predecessors in the intelligent design movement.  Intellectual property demonstrates the ontological character of information.  Acknowledging someone else’s intellectual contribution is the only “ethical” thing to do (and ethics don’t evolve).(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South African-born film editor wins Oscar

first_img29 February 2016The dystopian action movie Mad Max: Fury Road already has more than one Southern African connection: it was filmed in Namibia; some of the post-production was done by BlackGinger, the Cape Town animation and visual effects studio; and it stars South African-born actress Charlize Theron.Now, Margaret Sixel, the South African-born film editor, has won the Oscar for Best Editing in a Feature Film for her work on it. Her win was one of six Oscars that it picked up.Oscar for Best Editing: Margaret Sixel – Mad Max: Fury Road pic.twitter.com/jJc9oYh05q— FilmmakerIQ.com (@FilmmakerIQ) February 29, 2016Filmed in the Namibian desert, the blockbusting Australian action film Mad Max: Fury Road was one of the most surprising critical and commercial successes in 2015.Starring Tom Hardy and Theron, and directed by Australian George Miller, the film has won numerous awards over the past year, including Bafta and Critics’ Choice awards, culminating in several wins at the 88th Academy Awards, known as the Oscars, held in Los Angeles on Sunday, 28 February 2016.Margaret Sixel wins Best Editing for Mad Max, the first action film she’d ever edited. #Oscars2016 pic.twitter.com/M7rb8VDgWb— GamesRadar+ (@GamesRadar) February 29, 2016Sixel’s frenetic editing was described by the Los Angeles Times as “Herculean”, considering the amount of footage shot by Miller to bring his masterpiece to life. Miller, who is also Sixel’s husband, used up to 20 cameras to shoot more than 480 hours of film. Sixel spent over 6 000 hours crafting 2 700 individual cuts, helping to create what the Internet Movie Database (IMDB) praised as a two-hour “cerebral post-apocalyptic car chase”.Asked about her editing style in an interview in the run-up to the Oscars, Sixel justified the editing process as part of storytelling philosophy, saying: “I don’t like meaningless cutting. It must enhance the story and the characters.”[email protected] director George Miller with wife Margaret Sixel walking the #Oscars red carpet. #9Today pic.twitter.com/Ae7odLSXU1— The Today Show (@TheTodayShow) February 28, 2016According to a variety of filmmaking experts, the soul of the film came down to Sixel’s strong working relationship with Miller to find the heart of the film and her intuitive eye in creating thrilling tension without sacrificing the film’s narrative. Sixel has previously worked with Miller on his films Babe: A Pig in the City and the animated hit Happy Feet. Mad Max: Fury Road was her first action film.Asked by the Huffington Post why he choose a woman to tackle the intricacies of editing a large scale action movie, Miller answered that if he had used a male editor the film would “look like every other action movie”.The film was nominated for 10 Oscars, winning six, including Best Production Design, Costume Design and Sound Editing. The wins make Mad Max: Fury Road the most successful Australian production since The Piano in 1993. It also gives it the most wins at the Oscars for an Australian film since the Baz Luhrmann musical Moulin Rouge in 2001.On accepting the award, Sixel thanked her husband for his vision for the film, as well as his confidence in allowing her to experiment with the art of editing to give the film its unique feel. She added that the cast and crew involved in the most unlikely of Oscar winners had “incredible courage and guts to make this film”.Margaret Sixel wins Best Film Editing for “Mad Max: Fury Road” https://t.co/wvvnWW6pFt pic.twitter.com/jqbueVpJ0L— Los Angeles Times (@latimes) February 29, 2016Source: News24last_img read more

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Brand South Africa calls on citizens to get tested for HIV this World AIDS Day

first_imgJohannesburg, Saturday 01 December 2018 – This World AIDS Day – Brand South Africa encourages all citizens to play their part and get tested for HIV and know their status. Commemorated on 1st December each year, World AIDS Day presents an opportunity for humanity worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness.UNAIDS reports that South Africa has the biggest and most high-profile HIV epidemic in the world, with an estimated 7.2 million people living with HIV in 2017, and that the country accounts for a third of all new HIV infections in Southern Africa.Conversely, the country has also made significant strides in its mission to tackle the epidemic. According to UNAIDS data released in 2018 the country has made vast developments in getting people to test for HIV in recent years and is now almost meeting the first of the 90-90-90 targets, with 86% of people aware of their status. The country is also reported to have the largest ART programme in the world, which has undergone even more expansion in recent years with the implementation of ‘test and treat’ guidelines.“In 2017, there were 270,000 new HIV infections and 110,000 South Africans died from AIDS-related illnesses. South Africa has the largest antiretroviral treatment (ART) programme in the world and these efforts have been largely financed from its own domestic resources. In 2015, the country was investing more than $1.34 billion annually to run its HIV programmes. The success of this ART programme is evident in the increases in national life expectancy, rising from 61.2 years in 2010 to 67.7 years in 2015,” notes the UNAIDS report. South Africa was also the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to fully approve PrEP, which is now being made available to people at high risk of infection.GM for Communications at Brand South Africa Ms Thoko Modise said: “Although the country has achieved momentous milestones, we still have a long way to go. We need to strengthen out behavioural strategies – which involves applying a wide range of strategic interventions and conducting actions that modify negative behaviours and encourage positive behaviours through educational or motivational techniques.“In addition, reductions in HIV transmission need widespread and sustained efforts by all stakeholders including government, business and civil society. We collectively need to reinforce the mix of communication channels to disseminate messages to motivate people to engage in a range of options to reduce risk.”Founded in 1988, World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day to show solidarity with the millions of people living with HIV worldwide. South African citizens are called upon to show their support by wearing a red ribbon – which is the universal symbol of awareness and support for people living with HIV.“Play your part, get tested for HIV and know your status. The only way to know your HIV status for sure is to get tested. A person who is HIV positive may look and feel perfectly well, and be unaware that they are infected,” adds Modise.Brand South Africa, in collaboration with Freedom Park and its partners; Love Life, South African National AIDS Council and Africa Music Central, will host the World AIDS Day concert at Freedom Park. Activities will include a ZERO HIV/AIDS Park where HIV/AIDS prevention success stories, blood donation, voluntary testing and counseling, sharing information, updates on the latest discoveries in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, HIV/AIDS Dialogues which will provide a safe space to share ideas on combating AIDS. Brand South Africa will be promoting a pledge for all citizens to get involved in making decisions that will reduce new infections.Join the conversation:Follow Brand South Africa on Twitter: @Brand_SA; orLike us on Facebook: Official Brand South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Tsabeng NthiteTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 76 371 6810Email:[email protected] www.brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

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Sands China Ltd HK1928 has a market capitaliza

first_img Sands China Ltd. (HK:1928) has a market capitalization of US$60 billion. Prada’s (HK:1913) brand value increased 30% in 2013. A few months back, a young Chinese acquaintance of mine, who earns perhaps $500 a month, wrote to me about the loss of his iPhone. As someone who still uses a 10-year-old cellphone, I immediately wrote back asking why he owned an iPhone in the first place, as I’m sure it cost a year or more of his savings. In his current state of affairs, my friend must walk in the biting cold of the Chinese northeast to stand in line to collect hot water. So it’s safe to say he had better uses for that money, like moving to a place with a bathroom or hot water. Alas, I just heard from him again. And guess what? He bought another iPhone, this one the newest, best model. That anecdote is representative of my observations of Chinese consumer culture. Whenever I visit China, I’m always shocked to see that people leave a lot of food on their tables uneaten. And as I walk the streets there, I always find myself wondering why there are so many expensive cars parked outside rather decrepit buildings. It took me a few visits to learn that in China, people with luxury goods aren’t necessarily rich. Many women, for example, carry expensive name-brand purses. By outward appearances, they’re doing well. But after getting to know them, I’ve realized that many Chinese people own a few expensive gadgets or garments, but are otherwise quite poor. The common narrative is that China’s success over the past few decades has been driven by Chinese citizens embracing their Confucian ideals of working hard and being thrifty. Even economic and business textbooks attribute China’s success to those factors. Chinese people do seem to be hard workers, so I can’t argue with that. But in my personal experience, they’re not thrifty. Far from it: by and large, as soon as they get a little money, they can’t wait to spend it. I think that the touting of Confucian thriftiness is mostly a myth perpetuated among certain China bulls, as well as a retroactive rationalization for China’s successes of the last three decades. Michael Pettis, a Beijing-based economist, explains that a mere couple of decades ago, Confucianism was associated with being spendthrift and lazy. He says that the reason China’s savings rate is so high is not because the Chinese are astute savers, but because household earnings are a small—and shrinking—part of GDP. In other words, Chinese households lack access to cash. I’m a China bull myself. But I also believe we should look at the facts as objectively as possible. In this case, the facts do not support the mainstream view. The Path Forward To an investor, the million-dollar question is: how will today’s poor to middle-income societies like China react to economic success? Will they save and invest to compound their wealth quickly? Or will they spend money as soon as they earn it? Which answer you choose will lead to drastically different conclusions about how these countries will evolve economically, and how (and if) you should invest in them. Personally, I’m betting Asians’ high time preference (their desire to spend money now, rather than later) will win out. I visit malls in Asia often, and they’re booming. I’m convinced that the growth of luxury goods and high-end services will continue and perhaps accelerate. It’s pretty clear that as soon as Asian people have enough to eat, their brand consciousness kicks in, and they spend a disproportionate amount of money on status goods. I think that kind of consumption should not come until these countries’ economies are more mature and can better support it. But who am I to tell people how to live? Regardless, here’s a quick glimpse into the strength and financial prowess of the high-end sector in Asia: A nightclub operator, Magnum Entertainment Group Holdings Ltd. (HK:2080), recently IPOed in Hong Kong. Its share price increased approximately 100% shortly after the IPO.center_img Wynn Macau (HK:1128) has a market capitalization of US$22 billion. Macau, mind you, was a backwater colony of Portugal, dotted with a couple casinos, just 14 years ago. Now it’s bigger than Vegas. For now, my eyes are on Louis XIII Holdings Ltd. (HK:0577; HK$8.95). It’s building a casino in Macau that, when it becomes operational in 2016, will have minimum gaming bets of HK$5,000, and rooms starting at HK$10,000. In this high time-preference sector, I have a stink bid at HK$6.80. I’m watching closely, and if the company releases bad news, I’ll drop or remove that bid. But as long as it continues to execute apace, I see good value from the stock going forward.last_img read more

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TSLA data by YCharts But notwithstanding all the

first_img TSLA data by YCharts But notwithstanding all the hype on Wall Street, there was nothing remotely evident in its financials that justified Tesla’s $35 billion peak market cap. Net sales for the LTM period ended in September amounted to $2.9 billion, meaning that speculators were putting a Silicon Valley-style multiple of 12x sales on a 100-year-old industrial product, and one sold by a fly-by-night company distinguished from its auto company peers, which trade at 0.5x sales, only by marketing hype and a high-cost power plant that could be made by any of two dozen global car companies if there was actually a mass market demand for it. Needless to say, Tesla’s meager LTM sales were not accompanied by any sign of profits or positive cash flow. September’s LTM net income clocked in at negative $200 million, and operating cash flow of $150 million was dwarfed by capex of $700 million. Unless you are imbibing in the hallucination-inducing Kool-Aid dispensed by Goldman Sachs, which took this red-ink machine public in 2009 and has milked it via underwritings, advisories, and early-stage investments for billions, Tesla’s valuation was patently absurd. Yet the gamblers piled in based on the utterly improbable assumption that oil would remain at $115 per barrel forever; that a mass market for electric battery autos would soon develop; and that none of the powerhouse marketing and engineering companies like BMW, Toyota, or even Ford would contest Tesla for market share at standard industry profit margins. The truth is, there is massive excess capacity in the global auto industry owing to government subsidies and bailouts and to union protectionism that keep uncompetitive capacity alive; and that chronic condition is now especially pronounced due to the wildly soaring growth of unused production capacity in China. This means that the global economy is literally saturated with expert resources for auto engineering, design, assembly, machining, and component supply. Consequently, if a mass market were to develop for battery-powered vehicles, these incumbent industry resources would literally swarm into Tesla’s backyard. So doing, they would eventually drive margins to normal levels, sending Elon Musk’s razzmatazz up in the same cloud of smoke that has afflicted many of his vehicles. There is no reason to think that any long-term mass-market player in the auto industry could beat Toyota’s sustained performance metrics. In the most recent period, its net profits amounted to 7.5% of sales and it traded at 11x LTM net income. So even if you take as granted the far-fetched notion that in a world of $2-3 per gallon gasoline—which is likely here for a sustained duration—that a mass market will develop for electric battery vehicles, Tesla would still need upwards of $50 billion of sales at Toyota profit rates and valuation multiples to justify last September’s peak market cap. So let’s see. Tesla’s CY 2014 sales totaled $3.2 billion, meaning that you would need to bet on a 16x gain in sales over the next few years and that today’s ragtag startup manufacturing operation could achieve levels of efficiency, quality, and reliability that it has taken Toyota 60 years to perfect. Yet take one hard look at Tesla’s historical financials and it is blindingly evident that there is no reason for such an assumption whatsoever. In fact, Tesla is not a Toyota in the making: it is a Wall Street scam in plain sight. It has been a public filer for seven years now, and here are the horrific figures from its financial statements. Since 2007 it has booked cumulative sales of just $6.1 billion, and that ain’t much in autoland; it amounts to about one week of sales by Toyota and two weeks by Ford. Its cumulative bottom line has been a net loss of $1.4 billion, and the losses are not shrinking—having totaled nearly $300 million for 2014 alone. More significant, during its entire seven years as a public filer, Tesla has failed to generate any net operating cash flow (OCF) at all and has, in fact, posted red ink of $500 million on the OCF line. During the same seven-year span ending in Q4 of 2014, its capex amounted to a cumulative $1.8 billion. So go figure. Combining OCF and capex, you get a balance sheet hemorrhage of nearly $2.4 billion. The real question, therefore, is not why Tesla was worth $35 billion, but why it wasn’t bankrupt long ago? The answer is that it was and should be now. Tesla would not have even made it to its Goldman-led IPO without a $500 million bailout by Uncle Sam. That the hard-pressed taxpayers of America were called upon to underwrite a vanity toy for the wealthy—and one peddled by a serial milker of the public teat—is surely a measure of how deep crony capitalist corruption has penetrated into the business system of America. But even these egregious windfalls do not begin to compare with the gifts showered on Elon Musk by the money printers in the Eccles Building. Tesla has stayed alive only because it has been able to raise billions of convertible debt in the Wall Street casino at yields which are the next best thing to free money. In short, it has been burning massive dollops of cash for years and replenishing itself periodically in capital markets which are rife with momo speculators flying high on cheap carry trades and the Fed’s buy-the-dip safety net. During the spring of 2014, for instance, it raised $2.3 billion of five- and seven-year money at interest rates ranging between 25bps and 125bps. That’s right. This company is a red-ink-spewing rank speculation, but the money printers have enabled it to raise cash that costs virtually nothing on an after-tax basis. Call it free money for the Tesla bonfire of the vanities. True enough, these miniscule interest rates were attached to convertible bonds—so supposedly the “upside” justified giving a proven red-ink machine free money. Yes, and the strike price on those converts implied a market cap of about $50 billion! In truth, Tesla’s true losses are even greater than its accounting statements suggest. For instance, it has booked upwards of $500 million of revenue and profits owing to ZEV (zero emissions vehicle) credits. The latter were invented by Al Gore after he finished inventing the Internet and amount to nothing more than bottled air—clean or not. Also, Tesla’s affluent customers pocket about $10,000 per vehicle of federal and state tax credits, meaning that taxpayers have fronted another $500 million or so to stimulate Tesla sales. Finally, Tesla’s marketing machine has even converted itself into a repo man for the wealthy. That is, Tesla guarantees a large share of its customers that it will buy back their vehicles at no loss after three years. So how does it possibly make a profit deploying this blatant, free rent-a-car gimmick? Ask its accountants. In their wisdom and clairvoyance, they have undoubtedly assumed that the residual value of these vehicles will be levitated by the same juice which fuels Tesla’s stock price. Yes, Tesla is a bonfire of the vanities. In due course, the bubble will collapse and billions will have been wasted—much of it with taxpayer money—on things like its imaginary gigafactory in Nevada. But that’s what happens when central bankers destroy honest price discovery and turn capital markets into a gambling casino. David Alan Stockman (born November 10, 1946) is a former US politician and businessman, serving as a Republican US Representative from the state of Michigan (1977-1981) and as the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1981-1985). You can find more of his commentary at David Stockman’s Contra Corner. The trouble with the money-printing madness in the Eccles Building is that it generates huge deformations, misallocations, and speculative excesses in the financial markets. Eventually these bubbles splatter, as they have twice this century. The resulting carnage, needless to say, is not small. Combined financial and real estate asset markdowns totaled about $7 trillion after the dot-com bust and $15 trillion during the 2008-2009 financial crisis. Yes, the Fed has managed to reflate this cheap money bubble for the third time now, but the certainty that it will splatter once again is not the issue at hand. What gets lost in the serial bubble-making process of modern central banking is that vast real resources—labor, capital, and materials—are misallocated owing to mispricing of stock, bonds, and real estate during the bubble inflation phase. During the bust phase, of course, these excesses are written-down on financial statements and often liquidated entirely on an operational basis. But that’s just the problem. These bust-phase corrections amount to deadweight losses to the economy—a permanent setback to growth and societal prosperity. The Wall Street casino is now festooned with giant deadweight losses waiting to happen. But perhaps none is more egregious than Tesla—a crony capitalist con job that has long been insolvent and has survived only by dint of prodigious taxpayer subsidies and billions of free money from the Fed’s Wall Street casino. Not surprisingly, the speculative mania on Wall Street has reached such absurd lengths that Tesla is being heralded and valued as the second coming of Apple and its circus barker CEO, Elon Musk, as the next Henry Ford. Indeed, so raptured were the day traders and gamblers that in the short span of 33 months between early 2012 and September 2014, they ramped up Tesla’s market cap from $2.5 billion to a peak of $35 billion. That’s a 14x gain in virtually no time—and it’s not due to the invention of a revolutionary new product like the iPad. Instead, we’re talking about 4,600 pounds of sheet metal, plastic, rubber, and glass equipped with an electric battery power pack that has been around for decades and which is not remotely economic without deep government subsidies. Beyond that, the various Tesla models currently on the market carry price tags of $75k to more than $100k. So they are essentially vanity toys for the wealthy—a form of conspicuous consumption for the “all things green” crowd.last_img read more

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