Why city blocks work

first_imgConventional wisdom says that smaller city blocks are better for pedestrians. Research on urban form has traditionally suggested that smaller city blocks are better for foot traffic, and prominent urbanists have advocated them as key promoters of pedestrian access.  Urban planner Leon Krier pointed to the enhanced diversity and complexity of activity generated by smaller city blocks, while the late activist Jane Jacobs noted increased interactions and encounters among pedestrians on smaller grids. But the relationship between block size and walkability appears to be more complex and variable than previously thought. In some cases, researchers now say, larger city blocks may actually be better for pedestrians and communities. Andres Sevtsuk, assistant professor of urban planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and director of the City Form Lab, and co-researchers Raul Kalvo and Onur Ekmekci recently reached this conclusion in research published in the journal Urban Morphology. They analyzed a number of well-known cities for their current and potential walkability. They found that while Portland, Ore., could see walkability increase with larger blocks, it turns out that New York City’s street plan, laid out in 1811, remains near ideal. Sevtsuk talked with the Gazette about how city plans shape the pedestrian experience, and where this research could go in the future.  GAZETTE: How do urban planners define walkability, and what about walkability and city blocks do you study in your research?SEVTSUK: Walkability is a complicated term. It’s like sustainability. It’s an umbrella term, and there’s a lot going on underneath it. But generally speaking, researchers agree that there are at least two critical ingredients to any environment being walkable. First, an environment has to offer destinations to walk to. Second, walking paths have to be comfortable and safe. In the urban design and planning professions, there is a widely shared belief that for walkability, smaller blocks are always better. This assumption is so common that many transportation studies, too, use urban block size as a predictor for walking activity. We wanted to question that, and find out if that really is the case, and what’s at play here. There are surprisingly few studies about why particular dimensions have been chosen, historically, for different urban grids. If we look around the world, they come in enormous varieties.GAZETTE: The idea that smaller blocks increase, or enhance, walkability, accessibility — to me, this seems intuitive. What features of smaller blocks have fueled this assumption?SEVTSUK: There’s a couple of things at play. First, if you look at individual walks through a city from one person’s point of view, then smaller blocks always help shorten the walk. If you go from point A to point B through an urban grid, and the blocks are short, you can zigzag right through.But what’s good for individuals is not necessarily good for the community. Part of what we look at in our recent paper is collective access for everyone, not just individual walks. That’s where the conventional wisdom goes astray. The smaller your blocks, the more total perimeter you usually have. This perimeter could be activated through retail and commercial facades, and the more of that you have, the more animated or interesting an area tends to be. But if you take that to an extreme and have many tiny blocks, you start spending more time crossing streets instead of actually walking in front of stores. That’s where smaller is no longer better. Another aspect, which has captivated urbanists historically, is that city centers always have smaller blocks than outside areas. Block sizes tend to get bigger and bigger as we move from the city center out. That’s largely because the city center usually has the highest densities and highest land values, so circulation has to be really effective to handle that density. GAZETTE: You just noted a fairly important distinction: individual benefit versus collective benefit.SEVTSUK: Right, and I think that’s exactly where a lot of urban designers get it wrong. Jane Jacobs is right in saying that I could have a shorter walk in Manhattan if its blocks were half as long. If I were going from one particular metro stop to a particular restaurant, with blocks half as long as they are now, chances are my one walk to that restaurant would be shorter. But if our goal is to maximize access to all destinations in the area, then smaller blocks would produce more frequent street crossings, and we start sacrificing some of the useful destination frontage to not-so-useful street crossings. That’s what starts bringing down the collective usefulness of small blocks.What’s really interesting about block sizes is that they have a nonlinear effect on pedestrian accessibility. It’s not that larger blocks are better, or smaller blocks are better. The ideal blocks size for maximizing pedestrian accessibility varies according to the parcel and street dimensions that are used. With the large parcels used in the Adelaide grid in Australia, for example, the grid would be more walkable if it its blocks were half as long as they are today. Portland, Ore., on the other hand, was laid out with relatively small parcels. We discovered that Portland’s grid would have been more pedestrian-accessible had its planners made blocks more than twice as long as they are today. But after a certain size threshold, if your block gets longer, then we start, collectively, not getting access to as many destinations within a 10-minute walk as we could, at the peak. When a block gets shorter below the same peak, then we start crossing too many streets. There is a kind of critical block-size threshold below which we start spending too much time crossing streets.The four samples within the graphic depict urban grids with optimal block lengths that would maximize pedestrian accessibility. Graphic courtesy of Andres Sevtsuk/GSDGAZETTE: What cities in the United States and around the world do you and other planners consider particularly walkable?SEVTSUK: It’s interesting that the feeling of what is walkable, or what people think is walkable, depends not only on the ground layout of those cities but also on the uses and buildings that have come to occupy the ground layout. We have to keep both things in mind when we talk about experiences of grids. In the best of cases, the ground layout has created preconditions for a good activity mix and good building forms to occupy it. Manhattan is probably one of the most walkable environments in the whole world because the sheer amount of destinations that are accessible to anyone in a five-minute walk is just phenomenally high. Even if you ignore the vertical dimension of Manhattan, the horizontal density of the grid from the get-go was planned such that you just get access to so many more parcels within the same 10-minute walk than you do anywhere else in the world.Other city grids around the country are relatively small and offer decent, walkable block sizes. Portland, Ore., is very walkable; parts of Washington, D.C., are very walkable. Minneapolis, Minn.; Savannah, Ga. But in some cases, the walkability contribution does not necessarily come only from the ground layout, or the grid. It can come from conscious planning of pedestrian-oriented destinations or public transit that serves the urban core. We see very crowded and heavily walked streets in places that are not necessarily, from the perspective of the grid, set out in ideal dimensions. But I think the confluence of walkability benefits arrives when both the ground layout and the built form harmoniously produce an environment that’s both horizontally and vertically accessible, in terms of its programming. Manhattan happens to have all of these factors.GAZETTE: The Manhattan block length, which was laid out in 1811, has turned out to be almost optimal for pedestrian accessibility today. Given the drastic social, cultural, economic, and other changes that have taken place since the early 1800s, what aspects of walkability have been stable and constant enough to permit a plan that was made in 1811 to remain equally favorable today?SEVTSUK: Whenever grids have been historically established to start a new settlement or to plan an expansion to a settlement, there is this critical question at the outset: What timeframe shall we dimension this grid for? Shall we dimension it for our needs right now? That usually means that we need to build larger blocks, because at the very first phase of development, you don’t have high densities, and thus the number of people who can pay for the infrastructure, the tax base, is lower. But what Manhattan did is plan a very generous grid that could handle extreme densities 100 years later. It laid out an extremely fine-grained grid meant for much higher densities than the first phases of development that occupied that grid. Manhattan took a gamble to the future and envisioned a grid that was optimistic in terms of city growth from the get-go. It handled that gamble fairly well, because the grid grew gradually from the densest parts out. It didn’t get occupied all the way into Harlem immediately. It gradually expanded, and the density was following the grid.If you see some of the historic photos of the New York commissioners’ grid, it initially had one-story cottages on these parcels. Now we have 100-story buildings on similar parcels. Fairly soon after the grid was laid out, multistory buildings started appearing, making the infrastructure investment worth the while. But in other cases, in Australia for example, you have urban grids that, for very new settlements and low densities of inhabitation, consist of very large blocks. Economically, that makes sense at the outset. What happens over time with those blocks is that they start getting subdivided as the city densifies. New cross streets need to be cut in to make the grid more accessible, generating smaller blocks over time. Manhattan never had to really do that.GAZETTE: Globally, are there cultural patterns here, with certain cultures historically favoring certain block dimensions?SEVTSUK: Indeed, I think there are cultural, and I might even add technological determinants that have historically guided the choice of block sizes. If you go all the way back to monastic societies, you will find that there have been blocks that were more determined by religious and celestial influences. In more recent history, a lot of block sizes have been determined by the car. If we look at L.A., we see a gridiron environment with not just one large grid, but lots of different, smaller grids. This is dimensioned for the efficiency of the car, so that you don’t have to stop at red lights every half a minute, and you have a certain efficiency that you can drive to the next big arterial road. What we argue in the paper is that the times are turning again. City planners are interested in walkability rather than drivability. If we are wanting to make urban blocks more walkable, then we would not do the kinds of superblocks that L.A. was based on anymore.There has been a lot of energy and enthusiasm for more walkable environments in the last decade in American planning. Europe has never really lost interest in the pedestrian environment. Traditional European city centers have always been relatively walkable. It has to do partially with the fact that there has been a demographic shift in America in the last decade, with the rise of the millennial generation and statistically more people being interested in moving back to city centers. Along with that interest to move to the city center comes a collective interest toward more walkable environments.The average American does not walk that much — but if you look at people inside shopping malls, they park their car, then they spend two hours walking in a shopping mall without noticing that they’re actually walking. This is a very stimulating walk because you’re constantly passing stores and other attractions. People do walk if the environment is conducive to it. As planners, we try to get that same level of stimulation to happen on the streets. We want people to come outdoors and engage with public spaces. You could have a destination a mile away and the walk could be very comfortable, very nice granite paving with nice landscaping along the way. But if there is nothing else along the way to stimulate us, our probability of taking that walk starts dropping. The interest aspect, or the stimulation aspect, of the walks is very important.GAZETTE: With bicycling becoming increasingly popular in cities, does the planning field have an entirely new set of considerations to consider in terms of access?SEVTSUK: Today, the most valued cities and the best-serving cities will maximize accessibility on a multitude of transportation options. We can’t make everybody walk [laughs].One extreme is Venice: no cars, entirely walkable. You can’t really bike in most of Venice. Even though many of us enjoy going to Venice on a vacation and staying there and walking around, it’s really contriving in terms of other modes of access. Having a city that provides high-quality public transit, that provides a certain level of vehicular access, that has high-quality and safe bike routes, as well as a favorable pedestrian environment, is, I think, what we all would like to see. But what historically has been a huge problem is that some of these infrastructure systems, like vehicular systems, have dominated overwhelmingly, at the cost of the other systems. We have arterial roads and highways in many American cities, and because of them it’s really hard to walk through those cities. The challenge for the 21st-century cities will be to come up with novel and innovative ways in terms of superimposing and managing these different systems at the same time. So that even in a neighborhood that has good vehicular access, pedestrian systems are able to penetrate through that vehicular system and different destinations are connected most readily.GAZETTE: How would you go about testing these theories on the ground, with actual people?SEVTSUK: Most cities collect traffic data, but we don’t do that for pedestrians. What’s pretty exciting today in the type of research that I do is that technology is making the leap. Image-recognition software that can read activity from a simple camera feed and categorize objects that pass by as pedestrians, bicycles, cars, and so forth is becoming readily available. Also, several of the gadgets that we now carry around, like smartphones and watches, have built-in accelerometers that can detect how much we move or walk. This produces very large data sets that could help researchers understand how people’s walking behavior varies across large territories.This interview was edited for clarity and length.SaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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TOBAM seeks to bring Bitcoin to institutional investors

first_imgTOBAM is looking to raise money from institutional investors for Europe’s first mutual fund investing in Bitcoin.The French asset manager – a specialist in smart beta strategies – has developed an in-house team focussed on cryptocurrency research. It said cryptocurrencies had “the potential to become durable standards in financial and saving markets”.Yves Choueifaty, president of TOBAM, described Bitcoin as a “highly diversifying asset”, and said the company had conducted research into the digital currency “from a technical, financial, economic and regulatory point of view” for a year prior to the launch of the fund.“This first move in the world of cryptocurrencies showcases our dedication to remaining ahead of the curve and to providing our clients with innovative products in the context of efficient (i.e. unpredictable) markets,” Choueifaty said.  The fund is available via private placements into an unregulated alternative investment fund domiciled in France.In a statement, TOBAM said its fund allowed institutional investors to access the cryptocurrency “in a more convenient and safer vehicle”.  “While Bitcoin is prone to significant risks, including a very high level of volatility, it also provides diversification benefits,” the company said.TOBAM said it had “developed cybersecurity systems and cutting-edge technological capabilities over the past 12 years, both of which will back up the structure and functioning of the fund”. This included the management of “forks”, which occur when a change or update is made to the algorithm behind Bitcoin.Bitcoin’s value has exploded in the past 12 months, growing more than 1,000% in dollar terms from $748 to $8,263, according to Coindesk. Source: CoindeskHow the price of Bitcoin versus US dollar has developed in the past 12 monthslast_img read more

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Open-space assessment opposed

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – A Valencia resident who’s fed up with the city’s new push for an open-space measure and its property tax bite hopes to galvanize grass-roots opposition to the proposal. Jim Farley’s not against shrub-adorned hills instead of houses chockablock – he just wonders whether city residents should be saddled with the cost of buying them. “I’m against setting the precedent of a property tax assessment,” Farley said. “My concern is, once we set the precedent with this, even though it’s only $25 (a year), it opens the door for every other issue that’s `too important.”‘ On the heels of a failed November 2005 initiative to fund a park and open-space measure, the Santa Clarita City Council last week approved plans to pursue an undeveloped land preservation district. “(If they’re) only taxing people within the city, taxpayers in the city will be paying for something that benefits folks in the unincorporated areas,” he said. The Gas Co. technician says he’s never been politically active before but this issue vexes him, so he’s set up an e-mail address to organize an opposition voice. Should he attract a following, Farley has offered to provide an opposing argument on the ballot materials. The council is due to receive the engineer’s report April 24, and ballots could be sent out around May 25. Voters would have 45 days to return them. Farley can be reached at [email protected] [email protected] (661) 257-5255160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The particulars will be spelled out after an engineer’s report is done, but guidelines call for a $25-a-year assessment for each single-family home, a limit of $1 a year in adjustments, a term of 30 years and a focus on buying and conserving undeveloped land. Parkland may or may not be included. In November, the council approved $100,000 to fund consultants and the engineer’s report, but the city is prohibited from advocating for the measure. A citizen committee has raised funds for an ad campaign – consultant Scott Wilk declined to disclose how much – and should open its campaign headquarters in about 10 days. Mailings and a door-to-door effort will begin after the council approves the engineer’s report, Wilk said. Farley, a self-described conservative Republican, objects to what he calls the “slick marketing campaign” attached to the earlier measure, saying it was unfair to present a one-sided, pro argument only. A benefits assessment will be part of the report, but Farley wonders in advance about fairness, especially if the land buys are outside city limits. last_img
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Oscar again linked with move and speculation over Austin continues

first_imgA round-up of the latest transfer speculation involving Chelsea and QPR…Comments by Juventus boss Massimiliano Allegri have led to more speculation that Oscar could join the Italian club.Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho has insisted the 23-year-old, who signed a five-year contract last November, will not be leaving.And Kia Joorabchian, who acts as an adviser to Oscar, last week told the Italian media there was no prospect of the player joining Juve despite reports he could move in exchange for former Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba.But the Daily Mirror claim Allegri is stepping up his apparent bid to sign Oscar.It comes after Allegri was quoted as saying: “I would like a footballing inventor – they are never boring. like Real Madrid’s Isco and Brazil’s Oscar.“The addition of a number 10 to the mix is both a tactical desire and a desire to add ego to my team.”There has been speculation about Oscar’s future despite his long-term contractSky Sports say Chelsea are favourites to sign Stoke goalkeeper Asmir Begovic.And Baba Rahman’s agent Sascha Empacher has denied reports that the Augsburg left-back has misgivings about a potential move to Chelsea, who are reported to be interested in him.It was suggested that the Ghana international, 20, has concerns because previous big-money signings have not been given regular first-team football at Stamford Bridge.“No, that’s not true. It is a classic example of bad investigative journalism,” Empacher told German media.Meanwhile, West Brom want to sign Charlie Austin, the Birmingham Mail reports.QPR have not received any offers or enquiries for the striker despite a host of reports of both interest and bids.Albion boss Tony Pulis is said to be interested in Austin and determined to push through a deal to sign R’s winger Matty Phillips.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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2019 Ohio State Fair Junior Market Goat Show

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion: Jada Shroyer, Logan Co. (Champ. heavyweight)Res. Grand Champion: Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Res. Heavywight)Third overall: Jada Shroyer, Logan Co. (Champ Middlewight)Fourth overall: Madison Gilbert, Clinton Co. (Champ Lightweight) Photo by Emma Mathews.Fifth overall: Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Res Middleweight) Photo by Emma Mathews.Sixth overall: Tiffany Sunday, Pickaway Co. (Res. Lightweight)July 20, 2019Judge Mark Hoge, IllinoisLightweightChamp. Madison Gilbert, Clinton Co. (Class 4 winner)Res. Tiffany Sunday, Pickaway Co. (Class 4 second)MiddleweightChamp: Jada Shroyer, Logan Co. (Class 8 winner)Res. Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Class 7 winner)HeavyweightChamp: Jada Shroyer, Logan Co. (Class 11 winner)Res. Paige Pence, Clark Co. (Class 11 Second) Anara Shroyer walks her Lightweight goat around the ring. Jada Shroyer, Logan Co. had the Middleweight Champion. Laney Fourman from Darke County watches the judge. Denton Homan, Shelby Co., had a Middleweight class winner. The judge examines the goat of Paige Pence that won Res. Middleweight. Madison Gilbert, Clinton Co., had the Lightweight Champion. The same class produced the top two Lightweight market goats from Madison Gilbert, Clinton Co. (First Class 4) and Res. Champion Tiffany Sunday, Pickaway Co. (Second Class 4). Middleweight goat exhibitors Tiffany Sunday circles the ring. Jada Shroyer’s market goat was selected as the Grand Champion. Ethan Davies from Wood County. Briley Ashcraft, Athens Co., won Class 10.last_img read more

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4 Tips to Avoid Getting ‘Hangry’: Snacks for the Geocaching Trail

first_imgReid’s Personalized Nut Jumble (Note: Clearly snacks do not belong in geocaches unless you’re actually using them as Tupperware.) Geocachers are always prepared. GPS? Check. Pen? Check. But wait! What should you bring to combat the growling stomach that inevitably follows a finding frenzy on the geocaching trail? To answer this most important of questions, we decided to ask our fellow geocachers here at Geocaching HQ for their top remedies for an empty belly. Here are their top tricks and tips for a great geocaching adventure!Tip #1: Avoid getting ‘hangry’ (hungry + angry)Family and friends can take the geocaching fun-o-meter to a whole new level, but hungry people can sometimes be cranky people. Geocaching videographer Reid Kuennen (Username: reidsomething) advises always keeping snacks on hand. She says, “One thing you should know about me before we go geocaching together is that I have a tendency to get hangry (hungry + angry) if I don’t bring snacks. Over the years I’ve learned never to navigate too far from home without my trusty bag of trail mix.”Geoacching HQ User Experience lead Nick Botner (Username: Whiskey Bones) suggests a similar tactic to maximize your find potential and reduce the need to exhaust your carefully honed geosense scrounging for food in the forest. “If you’re going out into the wild, make sure you bring a little more than you might need. I know I can tend to get a little carried away with the whole ‘just one more cache’ so it’s nice to have the extra food and more importantly water to enable me to enjoy my time out there and not be reduced to eating the surrounding vegetation.”Tip #2: Stay hydratedNick in his must-find-one-more-geocache mode. Good thing he’s prepared with apples and beef jerky!Staying hydrated is key to keeping in tip-top geocaching shape. While drinking water is great (we highly recommend it!), there are other ways to keep hydrated as well. Nick likes to eat apples while out on the trail: “This not only stops the hunger but also helps hydrate me. Plus, the natural sugar gives me a little pick me up.” Power geocaching couple Jayme (Geocaching Community Manager) and Ben Hewitt (benandjayme) always make sure to have a good day pack with a hydration reservoir. “Sometimes we even add lemonade powder to one of our water bladders.”Packing in snacks is useless if nature gets to them first! Nick says, “It’s not often I go into bear country. But when I make my way into the swamps I make sure I bring a backpack that has a compartment on the top so in case I get too deep. Food and electronics can stay dry in their respective compartments.” Reid also reminds us that weather can be important when packing and snacking: “I recommend sealable plastic bags or light-weight Tupperware, both can be washed and used many times! You probably already know this, but chocolate melts, and it’s something to think about on hot days.”Tip #3: Cache in, Trash outAnything that you pack in should also be packed out (unless it’s in your belly of course!). Jayme and Ben warn that this is often easier said than done and can sometimes require a bit of hunting: “After we are done eating we always check the area to make sure we’ve gathered any rogue baggies that the wind has picked up.”Tip #4: DIY Snacks with ReidPersonalized Nut Jumble:Reid hunting for the perfect trail mix ingredients.Roasted almonds (a little salty)Roasted cashews (also salty)Pumpkin seedsSunflower seedsDried cranberries (preferably not sweetened… nature has sweetened them plenty)Dark chocolate chunks How to: The fun thing is that you get to put whatever you like in it! Above are some of my favorite ingredients.Surprise Dates:DatesChocolateAlmondsHow to: Putting these together is simple and sticky – pit the dates & shove (gently) an almond and hunk of chocolate inside.Now it’s your turn! What are your favorite snacks to bring out on the geocaching trail? Tell us about them in comments below! Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedA geocacher’s secrets to making New Year’s resolutions stickDecember 22, 2016In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Beat the Heat: 7 Safety Tips to Keep You Healthy, Happy, and Cool as a CucumberAugust 3, 2013In “Geocaching.com Videos”Featured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

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a month agoLiverpool boss Klopp puts Gerrard on notice

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool boss Klopp puts Gerrard on noticeby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp wants Steven Gerrard to succeed him when he eventually leaves his post at Anfield.Reds legend Gerrard is the current Rangers boss, and has guided the Glasgow club to second in the Scottish Premiership, three points behind bitter rivals Celtic.”Kenny (Dalglish) and Stevie have both been a really big support from day one,” Klopp told Four Four Two.”Second, my position as a manager has nothing to do with the people around me. If Liverpool were to sack me tomorrow, then maybe Kenny would be the first choice to replace me, but they would probably bring Stevie down from Glasgow.”If you ask who should follow me, I’d say Stevie. I help him whenever I can. If someone gets your job, it’s not about them, it’s about you not being good enough.”I’m old enough to know that I give this job everything. I’m not a genius, I’m not perfect, but I give the club 100 per cent. If that’s enough, great. If it’s not, then it’s just the problem of the situation.” last_img read more

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22 days agoEx-Chelsea fullback Johnson: I didn’t believe Abraham was this good

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ex-Chelsea fullback Johnson: I didn’t believe Abraham was this goodby Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Chelsea fullback Glen Johnson admits Tammy Abraham has surprised him.Abraham has scored eight goals already for Chelsea this season, seven coming in the Premier League.“I didn’t know Tammy Abraham was capable of this to be honest last season, so it’s great to see,” Johnson said on talkSPORT.“Maybe there’s more out there, maybe there’s more that they give a chance, they will take it with both hands.“Yeah, they found themselves in an unfortunate situation [with the transfer ban] but I feel like they are kind of dealing with it in the right way.”With Chelsea unable to sign players in January, Johnson reckons a top-six finish in the Premier League would be a success.“I think fifth, even sixth, would be a good season,” Johnson said.“They can’t sign anyone, they lost pretty much their best player [Eden Hazard], can’t replace him, got to give kids a chance, some of them had never played in the Premier League before.“I think sixth would be a good season for them.” last_img read more

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Photo: Jim Harbaugh Attended Class With 4-Star DT Recruit Boss Tagaloa Today

first_imgHead coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts to a first half call against the Maryland Terrapins.COLLEGE PARK, MD – OCTOBER 03: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts to a first half call against the Maryland Terrapins at Byrd Stadium on October 3, 2015 in College Park, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)We already know that Jim Harbaugh will go to many lengths in his recruitment of blue-chip athletes. Today, Harbaugh visited De La Salle High School in Concord, Calif., to check in a pair of four-stars: defensive tackle Boss Tagaloa and tight end Devin Asiasi. Not only did Harbaugh meet with both players, he also sat in class with Tagaloa, who posted a picture of the coach on his Snapchat account.  Here is Jim Harbaugh attending class with Boss Tagaloa @_BT75 today. pic.twitter.com/hhc7Ggcwlq— Tom VanHaaren (@TomVH) January 19, 2016Also, a screenshot of a Facebook post from a De La Salle faculty member also mentions Harbaugh’s presence.Apparently Jim Harbaugh participated in a class lesson at De La Salle while visiting Devin Asiasi and Boss Tagaloa pic.twitter.com/2diNOFBHei— The Victors News (@TheVictorsNews) January 19, 2016Looks like Coach Harbaugh had himself a nice day in school.last_img read more

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