Seniors spend fall break at thesis boot camp

first_imgWhile some seniors spent fall break at home, on a road trip or in Las Vegas, 29 members of the Class of 2014 got a jump start on their theses in Thesis Camp, sponsored by the Hesburgh Library and the University Writing Center. Matthew Capdevielle, director of the University Writing Center, said the program, which began in fall 2010, is intended to help students get to know themselves as writers. “The goal of the camp is to help writers develop a clearer sense of their own best practices and to build a healthy momentum that will see them successfully through the project,” Capdevielle said. The Writing Center and the Library achieved this goal by offering daily breakfast and lunch to students, making specialist librarians available to them, sponsoring speakers to address them and dedicating a special space for seniors within the library, Capdevielle said. “We want to create an immersion experience for them … but it’s also an opportunity to develop some really healthy and productive writing habits that will stick with them throughout the duration of this project,” he said. Laura Bayard, graduate outreach services librarian and a coordinator of Thesis Camp, said the program offers a perfect balance for students through non-mandatory programming and dedicated work time. “We know it works because the students inevitably say, ‘I had no idea I’d get this much done on my paper,’” Bayard said. Bayard said departmental librarians met with students to discuss specific resources available to them, and other programming targeted science majors who have more quantitative projects. Seniors also interacted with graduate students who were conducting dissertation research, she said. For those feeling pressure to complete their theses, a staff member from the University Counseling Center even spoke to the students about stress relief, and a tai chi session was held, Bayard said. Every day, representatives from the University Writing Center opened and closed the day with guidance, Capdevielle said, and they were also available for one-on-one consultations. “We do group goal setting sessions in the morning and kind of a writing warm-up and a check-in at the end of the day where we wrap up, we share our accomplishments, we put our list of accomplishments up on the board,” Capdevielle said. In these sessions, tutors from the University Writing Center presented useful writing strategies, Capdevielle said. “One of the tools that we invite writers to use during this camp is something we call the thesis log or the project log, and that’s just a process log for writers to capture information about their own process,” he said. Matt Hayes, a senior Italian and Program of Liberal Studies major, said these writing strategies helped him to be productive during Thesis Camp. “They were very helpful in teaching us various strategies on how to get things done,” Hayes said. “One is called ‘the pomodoro.’ … It’s Italian for ‘tomato.’ It was working in 25-minute increments and then you give yourself a five-minute break.” Zach Leonard, a senior classics major, said he most appreciated the special library space. “The most helpful resource [was] probably dedicated space,” Leonard said. “They put all the seniors in the bottom floor and that was helpful because I could pretty much have the same desk every day and it was quiet down there. The working environment was good.” Hayes said he is glad he attended Thesis Camp because he knew he would not have written the 10 pages he completed if he had been at home. “I’m a very easily distracted person, and I know if I went home I would have probably laid in my bed all day and watched Netflix. … Just forcing myself to wake up every morning at 8 a.m. to get there at 8:30 for breakfast, and just that uninterrupted time in the library, was probably the most productive I could’ve been over this break within reason,” he said. Leonard said his goal was to write 15 pages for his thesis, and he came close to meeting it. “My thesis is due by Thanksgiving, so I really needed to get a head start on it and finish up a lot of work. … I did not plan to stay in South Bend for my final fall break. It was annoying to see my friends go out and have so much fun, but in the end, it really was worth it to have done this,” Leonard said. For seniors continuing to write their theses, Capdevielle said the University Writing Center offers programming throughout the year, including “Write First” mini camps that take place from 8 to 10 a.m. from Monday to Friday in the Writing Center, one-on-one consultations with tutors and read-ahead service for thesis writers. Bayard said all seniors submitting theses should apply for the Undergraduate Library Research Award due Apri. 10 with a $1000 first prize award. “For senior thesis entries … it’s not given on the strength of the senior thesis,” she said. “It’s given on the essay written about library resources and how the libraries and our resources informed the paper.” Contact Tori Roeck at vroeck@nd.edulast_img read more

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Our 12 Favorite Fan Photos From the Peter Pan Live! Scavenger Hunt!

first_img “I’M FLYING!” Awwww Nana! Jealous. Holding @kelliohara’s hand. #PeterPanHunt pic.twitter.com/Spv9lIkiV1 — Leilani H (@leilanihanaike) December 5, 2014 Tinkerbell #peterpanhunt pic.twitter.com/6raNBO15Yx — Kiara (@TewKhuteKiara) December 5, 2014 NEWSIE MUSTACHE #PeterPanLive “Did that just happen?” #peterpanhunt pic.twitter.com/n1m0WShhWO — Laura (@LauraStar663) December 5, 2014 AND THE EMMY GOES TO… Hey look—mustache! #PeterPanHunt #PeterPanLive pic.twitter.com/zxHUlHlb2F — Nikki Kim (@serenitymoon123) December 5, 2014 I’m flying #PeterPanLive #peterpanhunt @broadwaycom pic.twitter.com/TIusfA1CPh — Danielle Ashley (@danielleashly) December 5, 2014 CROC! AWW, NANA… “DID THAT JUST HAPPEN?” CROC!!!!! #PeterPanHunt #PeterPanLive pic.twitter.com/1f7HVNAakw — Nikki Kim (@serenitymoon123) December 5, 2014 STAR OF THE NIGHTcenter_img “I CAN’T EVEN.” THE EMMY ABSOLUTELY GOES TO THIS STAR!!! #QueenOHara #PeterPanHunt pic.twitter.com/EBx2OE5Qtl — S (@Fanzel24601) December 5, 2014 Cutest Lost Boy! #PeterPanHunt #PeterPanLive pic.twitter.com/wulcclKNZX — Lydia (@JustLegallyMe) December 5, 2014 What a night! We hope you had a blast eating Pirate’s Booty, drinking green Midori sours and of course, playing Broadway.com’s Peter Pan Live! Scavenger Hunt on December 4. Broadway.com readers posted so many awesome, sweet and hilarious photos of the broadcast to the hashtag #peterpanhunt on Twitter, and we just had to share a few of our favorites. Check out some of the buried treasure we found! — Sophia Fortuna (@sogck47) December 5, 2014 TINKER BELL “I’ve never locked a window!” #icanteven #strangerdanger #PeterPanHunt #PeterPanLive pic.twitter.com/LlVlThybm0 — Julie Achilles (@julieachilles) December 5, 2014 CUTEST LOST BOY TAP-DANCING HOOK Tap dancing Hook!!! #PeterPanHunt pic.twitter.com/L4tZzMRBc4 I spy a Newsie! @RySteele #PeterPanHunt pic.twitter.com/5hS1XIqSzr — Kate Brown (@kate_brown7349) December 5, 2014 Star of the Night… Christian Borle and his really nice arms #PeterPanLive #PeterPanHunt pic.twitter.com/Y44YAQMkaH — Nick Eibler (@Nickolase77) December 5, 2014 View Commentslast_img read more

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Broadway.com’s Imogen Lloyd Webber & More Talk Theater at NCTF Roundtable

first_imgStage favorites and theater tastemakers aligned at the National Corporate Theatre Fund’s 12th annual Broadway roundtable on February 6 at UBS. Broadway.com news editor Imogen Lloyd Webber was on hand to chat about theater with You Can’t Take It With You star Richard Thomas, Living on Love playwright Joe DiPietro, playwright and performer Dale Orlandersmith and producer Elliott Masie. The chat was moderated by NCTF executive director Bruce E. Whitacre. After the roundtable, Lloyd Webber and Thomas snapped a photo with Linda Powell, actress and daughter of former U.S Secretary of State Colin Powell. View Commentslast_img read more

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iTech’s Kishore Khandavalli named finalist for NE entrepreneur award

first_imgiTECH has announced that CEO Kishore Khandavalli is a finalist for the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year 2009 Award for New England. The Ernst & Young the awards program recognizes entrepreneurs who demonstrate extraordinary success in the areas of innovation, financial performance and personal commitment to their businesses and communities.  Kishore Khandavalli was selected as a finalist from hundreds of nominations by a panel of independent judges.  Award winners will be announced at a special gala event on June 16th at the Marriott Newton Hotel in Boston. Khandavalli was profiled in the January 2007 issue of Vermont Business Magazine.iTech is a  total solutions company specializing in providing software consulting services, application development and business process services. The company which has been headquartered in South Burlington, Vermont since 2003 has revenues of more than $40 million. In 2007, iTech was ranked 113 on Inc’s 500’s Fastest Growing Private Companies.  The company was ranked third on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 List. iTech is a certified minority-owned corporation and employes 350 professionals in the US. Clients include Microsoft, Qualcomm, Bally, Lehman Bros, the State of Georgia, Eclipse Aviation and Pitney Bowes.The Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year awards program celebrates its 23rd anniversary this year.  The program has expanded to recognize business leaders in over 135 cities in 50 countries throughout the world.Regional award winners are eligible for consideration for the Ernst & Young LLP Entrepreneur Of The Year national program.  Award winners in several national categories, as well as the overall national Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year award winner, will be announced at the annual awards gala in Palm Springs, California on November 14, 2009.  The awards are the culminating event of the Ernst & Young Strategic Growth Forum, the nation’s most prestigious gathering of high-growth, market-leading companies.SponsorsFounded and produced by Ernst & Young LLP, the Entrepreneur Of The Year awards are pleased to have the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and SAP America as national sponsors.In New England region, sponsors include Bowne, Curran & Connors, Boston Magazine, J.Robert Scott, Marsh USA, Nixon Peabody and AMS.About Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur Of The Year® Awards Program Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur Of The Year® Award is the world’s most prestigious business award for entrepreneurs. The award makes a difference through the way it encourages entrepreneurial activity among those with potential and recognizes the contribution of people who inspire others with their vision, leadership and achievement. As the first and only truly global award of its kind, the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year® award celebrates those who are building and leading successful, growing and dynamic businesses, recognizing them through regional, national and global awards programs in more than 135 cities in 50 countries.Source: iTech. BURLINGTON, VT.  MAY 20, 2009 –last_img read more

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Caribbean Nations Synchronize their Information Operations Capabilities

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo March 20, 2019 Military and security partner nations gathered at the VII Annual Caribbean Region Information Operations Council (CRIOC) in Nassau, Bahamas, February 18-21, 2019. The objective of the meeting was to develop Information Operations (IO) strategies to counter transnational threats in the Caribbean. The Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF) hosted the event with sponsorship from U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) and U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). “CRIOC enhances IO, Military Information Support Operations (MISO), and Strategic Communications (STRATCOM) by planning, coordinating, and synchronizing Caribbean partner nations’ information-related capabilities to counter transnational threat networks and strategic competitors operating in the Caribbean region,” said Dr. Benjamin P. Gochman, chief of Engagements at NORTHCOM’s IO division. “CRIOC members face many common threats, like narcotrafficking, illegal arms, gang violence, human trafficking, and illegal poaching. If we pull together our resources and conduct collective security, we can better counter those threats and respond to save lives.” CRIOC members from The Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, France, Great Britain, Jamaica, Netherlands, Trinidad & Tobago, and Turks & Caicos participated at the annual meeting to discuss current operations. Colombia and Mexico attended the event for the first time as observers. “CRIOC is an opportunity to show our interest in working and collaborating with the Caribbean region and with the hemisphere. CRIOC helps to build the kind of camaraderie and networks necessary to address quite a number of illicit activities that our region faces,” said Royal Bahamas Defence Force Commodore Tellis Bethell, chief of Defence Staff. “In this process, we’re able to share information that helps us improve our techniques and tactical capabilities to do a better job with, not only communicating to the public, but also receiving information from the public, so we can do our jobs in a more effective manner.” Developing IO capabilities During the conference, each country presented their IO capabilities and STRATCOM plans. RBDF talked about Operation Marlin Spike, an IO/STRATCOM initiative with support from NORTHCOM to created public awareness on RBDF duties and actions in regards to the safety of Bahamians. The operation encourages public support to help RBDF to address criminal issues and to disrupt or discourage those who seek to violate The Bahamas’s laws. The campaign helps deter, prevent, and interdict criminal acts, and has an extensive outreach program, including a tip line to report criminal activities, among other programs. “Marlin Spike targets messaging, influencing, and informing the public. We want to make sure the public knows what we’re doing to mitigate the challenges and threats that our country faces,” said RBDF Lieutenant Commander Carlon Bethell, director of RBDF’s Operations Command Center. “IO helps to deter the bad guys, sending them a message that makes them think twice about carrying out nefarious activities—poaching, migrant smuggling, or human trafficking.” Mexico talked about the importance of social media for their IO campaigns. “For Mexico’s Department of the Navy [SEMAR in Spanish], IO is extremely important. We develop high-impact naval operations within the framework of the [country’s] Internal Security Law to fight transnational criminal organizations, and we’ve had very good results,” said Mexican Navy Captain Daniel Álvarez Navarrete, deputy director of the SEMAR’s Information and Influence Strategies Division. “It’s important to learn new information strategies to strengthen our capacities and develop them in support of naval operations to fulfill of our mission and positively influence the people of Mexico.” The future of IO strategies Jamaica Defence Force Captain Michelle Brown, an intelligence officer, said regional cooperation is crucial for the future of IO campaigns in the Caribbean region. “We have an IO plan, but we are learning a lot from our Caribbean and international partners. CRIOC allows us to highlight our strengths and weaknesses. It also provides some answers on how we can go about fixing our weaknesses,” she said. “In the long term, we’ll have more robust IO planning for all countries that are represented here. Countries that are already at an advanced stage [of IO capabilities], will become even more advanced, and those that start now, will receive guidance from other members.” CRIOC members agreed that the Caribbean has different approaches to common threats and challenges. “Participating in CRIOC lets us know insights on how to solve common challenges,” said Royal Netherlands Forces Lieutenant Canan Babayigit, public affairs and spokeswoman in the Caribbean. “It’s interesting to participate here and to learn from other countries on how they do IO. CRIOC is a very good initiative. We don’t want to reinvent the wheel. We can exchange knowledge or experiences to get better, and to handle and react on all sorts of issues as one team.” IO strategies help Caribbean nations build relationships and work toward a common goal. “In this region, we’re all small countries, so if we can leverage lessons learned and build on relationships, we can get better and gain experience,” said Royal Bermuda Regiment (RBR) Major Duncan E.R. Simons, RBR’s Public Relations officer. “A lot of what we do is not in the public eye. A lot of what we do is about perception, and as long as our perception is positive among our communities and target audiences, then it’s a force multiplier.” Participants agreed to work together to develop common strategic messages to counter illicit activities. The VIII Annual CRIOC will take place in Jamaica, in March 2020.last_img read more

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Want to know what your customers need? Just ask.

first_img continue reading » As digital banking has matured, consumer behavior has shifted substantially. People now interact with their financial institutions through digital channels far more than through any other touchpoint. As the way people come to their bank or credit union evolves, how financial institutions market to their accountholders must also change – or they risk losing touch with what consumers want.The answer is not to double down on old-school “spray and pray” marketing that’s neither targeted nor actionable. Impersonal promotions can degrade the service channel experience. A better strategy is to use an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered platform that combines stored accountholder data with individual needs and preferences gleaned from short interviews in digital channels. As these platforms utilize machine learning to gain insight from stored data and quick digital conversations, they become smarter and more effective over time.Once an AI-powered marketing system is in place, your organization can develop clear strategies for deepening existing relationships and expanding your customer or member base. 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Why this guy may just be the most important member of your credit union

first_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Andrew Kennelly Andrew Kennelly is president of True ID Pro.  A comprehensive Identity and Credit Monitoring solution that serves credit unions, offering a wide range of programs including White label, and Co- … Web: https://trueidpro.com Details With an expected $16 trillion dollars in wealth transferring from one generation to the next, it is important that Credit unions look at each of these generations both as a group and as a subset of the entire membership base.  I will be touching on Baby Boomers, individuals between the ages of 54 and 74Gen X, individuals between the ages of 34-54And Millennials, individuals between the ages 18-34But for the purposes of this article, I will be focusing on Millennials, we will discuss the others in upcoming articles.SOME COMMON CHARACTERISTICS OF MILLENNIALS:Demanding: Because they grew up in an ‘everyone wins a prize’ environment, Millennials are sometimes self-centered. As the first fully digital generation, they also expect things instantaneously. Having access to companies like Netflix, YouTube and Amazon drives their desire for immediacy as well.Staying at Home Longer: Millennials are getting married later than their parents, staying at home longer and paying off ridiculously high student debts. Largest Generation in the Workforce: According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Millennials will overtake the majority representation of the U.S. workforce this year and will represent 75% of the workforce by 2030.Mobile First: Millennials lead active lifestyles and have an ‘always on’ mentality. Reaching them through email is challenging because their personal email inboxes are flooded. However, texts get a 98% open rate and app notifications (when done correctly) can be very effective ways of reaching them.HOW MILLENNIALS INTERACT WITH MONEY IN A DIGITAL WORLDImagine if you were to watch Netflix, YouTube, or any streaming service and it kept buffering or crashing on you. How soon would you get frustrated and leave? I am willing to guess you would not stay a member for very long.  Millennials are using their phones for social media, music, ordering food, dating and much more. And are increasingly using them to manage their money, send payments to peers, and pay for services on the go.  Millennials are looking for an experience that helps them manage their money better. Accenture has found that “67% of Millennials are interested in tools and services which help them create and monitor a budget.”It is clear, that there’s a growing demand for digital money management. It follows that if you create an technology driven culture, you will increase your chances of becoming the primary financial institution for your members. WHAT ARE CREDIT UNIONS DOING WRONG NOW?Credit Unions are very focused on their traditional branch-based models and not enough on putting the member first. When most Credit Unions are asked what their strategy is focused on, improving digital products and putting the member first nearly always tops the list. But when you look at surveys of where they focus their spending, it’s almost always on regulation. In addition, existing technology is almost always to blame when the credit union can’t move fast enough.If you asked 100 Millennials, less than 10 would be able to tell you what regulations you face. They don’t care. They just want a great experience. And for them, that is digital.Regulation, compliance, and security are big priorities, sure. Very important. One poor move here and your entire company could be ruined. But when you look at the money that venture capitalist and Silicon Valley are pumping into FinTech it is enough to make you sit up and rethink your traditional business model.There are 5,647 Credit unions in the US, according to CUNA down from 11,392 in December of 1998.  Do you think the trend of consolidation is going to slow down as Millennials become more demanding and new options enter the marketplace? It’s not likely. Lastly, according to CUNA, the average credit union member is getting older and older. If Credit Unions want to survive as Millennials begin to dominate the economic landscape and the workforce, they will have to turn this trend around and appeal to younger demographics.WHAT CREDIT UNIONS CAN DO ABOUT ITCredit Unions have control over two things right now: internal culture and technology.In terms of culture, the digital push needs to come from the top down, and everyone needs to understand why digital important. An outdated product-focused model that doesn’t focus on the members is not going to cut it for Millennials.  The want more than a simple Online banking experience.Credit Unions still have control over their technology. One option is to start a separate digital-only financial institution with a completely new back-end to attract these users. But this not a very practical solution for most credit unions. The other option is a partnering with innovative companies in the Fin Tech space to help your credit union become more agile.  This also allows you to move with the speed of technology and create and upgrade your offerings over time, so you can have a modern, robust framework to compete for wallet share.HOW CREDIT UNIONS CAN PROFIT FROM THIS RELATIONSHIPOne of the most common comments I hear from credit unions is, “I have an aging account holder base and I want to attract more Millennials. The issue is that Millennials don’t hold nearly the deposits Boomers do and don’t make the same level of income.”This may be true in general, but:Millennials are the future or your Credit Union.Many Millennials are your most profitable members.In 2011 Javelin Strategy & Research quietly introduced a new way of looking at and studying different types of account holders. This new theory of consumer classification was not based on age or income, but instead broke down the general public by regular use of online and mobile banking. The group that represented the largest and fastest growing trend of this digital-first mentality was given a new name: Moneyhawks.  And as you probably guessed, most Moneyhawks are millennials. A few facts about Moneyhawks, according to Javelin Strategy and Research:There are 31 million Moneyhawks in the U.S. (13% of population)They control 41% of the deposits and 33% of investable assets20% of Moneyhawks are at high risk of leaving their primary bank or credit unionAdding to this, Javelin Strategy and Research found this puts an estimated 103 million financial accounts and $1.1 trillion in deposits into play, plus another $5.8 trillion in investable assets. That represents 72% of deposits held by potential switchers, and 71% of investable assets. Credit Unions can’t afford to ignore numbers like these!HOW TO WIN THEIR BUSINESSMillennials are generally technology driven. As a matter of fact, 53% of millennials would rather lose their sense of smell than their technology.If your Credit Union can deliver a robust and engaging digital experience and you can get it in front of them, you will win their business.According to Javelin Strategy you should offer the following advantages:Let them monitor ALL their accounts in one place. Allow access anywhere, anytime.Enable the ability to move money when and how they want.Offer flawless security.Make it easy, make it work.CONCLUSION FOR MILLENNIALSMillennials fully expect innovation in financial services to come from outside of the industry, and they say that “offering digital banking won’t be enough to build a long-lasting relationship.” Credit Unions should advise young people on how to manage their finances, seek Millennials’ feedback, hire young employees, and partner with financial companies, outside of the traditional channels.If you want to lower the average age of your customer or member base, you must re-imagine the entire way you do things. You can no longer be transactional. You must put the needs of members first and offer better digital experiences.last_img read more

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Boy, 15, Fatally Shot in Hempstead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 15-year-old boy was fatally shot in his hometown of Hempstead early Monday morning, Nassau County police said.Hempstead village police officers responded to a report of shots being fired and found the victim, Josue Guzman, dead at the corner of Laurel Avenue and Linden Avenue shortly after 1 a.m., police said.No arrests have been made.Homicide Squad detectives ask anyone with information regarding this shooting to call Nassau County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

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Retail: prime offer continues to improve

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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India’s richest man takes on Amazon, Walmart in e-commerce gamble

first_imgEarly signs have not been promising for JioMart since its roll-out in 200 Indian cities in May. Customers have complained about everything from rotting vegetables to missing deliveries and delayed refunds.An avid online shopper who buys electronics from Amazon and clothing from Walmart-owned retailer Myntra, Mehul Shah is the kind of customer much sought after by Ambani and his rivals.The 22-year-old placed his first JioMart order soon after the platform’s hotly-anticipated launch.”I wanted to experience what it was like… because there was so much hype around it,” he told AFP.But fewer than half his items were delivered and mint leaves he ordered arrived rotten, forcing Shah to throw them away. ‘Teething issues’ A Reliance source told AFP JioMart had received an “amazing” response from consumers.”People in small towns are buying Del Monte olives and focaccia bread… They are aware of global trends and want more options,” he said.But he acknowledged the company faced “teething issues” in logistics — problems which analysts believe could prove its Achilles heel. “You need consistent delivery models and customer satisfaction” to run a successful e-commerce operation, Forrester Research senior forecast analyst Satish Meena told AFP.Reliance will not “have a walkover just because of their financial strength”, he said.Some customers have already sworn off the platform.Vamshi Krishna, 28, told AFP he would never again buy anything from JioMart after his first two orders went missing.”Despite problems with my first order, I decided to give them a second chance… because it is an Ambani company,” he said.”Now I seriously doubt whether I will ever get my money back.” Backed by multi-billion-dollar investments from global tech giants, India’s richest man is ready to rumble with Amazon and Walmart for the country’s huge e-commerce market through his conglomerate Reliance.But it is far from certain that Mukesh Ambani’s latest gamble will pay off in a crowded market where many suppliers are not well-versed in digital business.The mogul has long trumpeted his ambition to revolutionize retail in the country of 1.3 billion by convincing farmers and shopkeepers to sell their goods on his new JioMart platform launched this year. Money, money, money Shah’s experience underlines the challenges facing Ambani as he attempts to take on Amazon, BigBasket and Grofers, all of which have established supply and delivery networks in India.The 63-year-old tycoon will likely deploy the same strategy he used to make his Jio mobile service a market leader following its 2016 launch.Jio’s cut-price discounts put phones in the hands of millions of first-time buyers in India, clobbering the competition and driving rivals out of the race.In recent months Ambani has raised more than $22 billion in a rights issue and through selling stakes in Reliance to foreign investors.The conglomerate is now net-debt-free and has cash to burn, analysts say.”JioMart will use the money by offering deep discounting to get consumers, and is in it for the long haul,” said independent analyst Minakshi Ghosh.But the firm will also need to pump funds into training local shopkeepers in online trading. Many say their businesses have been badly hit by the rise of supermarkets and e-commerce.”Even in my dreams I never imagined running such a modern business… or receiving card payments,” said Kavita Chowdhury, a shopkeeper in Navi Mumbai, a city neighbouring India’s financial capital.Her partnership with JioMart could not have come at a better time for the 30-year-old, with the coronavirus pandemic forcing her to shutter the bricks-and-mortar store.She can now sell online instead and business is booming, she told AFP.center_img Topics : But modernizing India’s creaky, inefficient supply chains will not be easy, even for Reliance, the nation’s largest retailer by revenue with a portfolio including supermarkets, electronics stores and fast-fashion outlets.Google on Wednesday became the latest Silicon Valley player to invest in the digital unit of the Indian oil-to-telecoms juggernaut, following in the footsteps of Facebook and Intel.These votes of confidence notwithstanding, Ambani’s success will depend on India’s mom-and-pop stores and their ability to adapt to the demands of an online business, analysts say.Keeping bargain-hungry consumers satisfied in a fiercely contested market may be even harder.last_img read more

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