New dean for School of Dental Medicine

first_imgAs HSDM’s dean, Giannobile will advance the School’s predoctoral and postdoctoral educational programs, transform clinical care, and further enhance the HSDM’s reputation as a renowned leader in research and dental education. He will work closely with Daley and other Harvard University leaders, as well as affiliated hospitals, institutions, and community clinics to advance HSDM’s mission.“The Harvard School of Dental Medicine is a pillar of the Harvard life-sciences ecosystem, integrating oral health with medicine. It has deep connections within the Longwood community and throughout the University,” said Harvard Provost Alan Garber. “Will Giannobile, with his wide-ranging accomplishments as a scholar, leader, teacher, and practitioner, is uniquely suited to head a school whose approach to dental health draws heavily on medicine, bioengineering, and public health. He brings to the role a deep set of relevant experiences and a longstanding commitment to the field of dental education. I am confident that under his leadership HSDM will augment the strengths of the broader Harvard community.”“I am so appreciative of President Bacow, Provost Garber, and HMS Dean Daley for this incredible opportunity to serve HSDM community as the new dean,” Giannobile said. “The tradition of excellence of the School as a leader in global education, research, clinical care, and societal impact creates exciting new avenues of interactions with our diverse array of students, staff, faculty, alumni, and friends. The Longwood Medical Area and fruitful partnerships with the Medical School and affiliates create opportunities for collaboration to promote science, innovation, and education. I feel honored to continue building on the legacy of outstanding leadership at Harvard.”Giannobile brings an extensive scientific background to the role. At the University of Michigan, he leads a laboratory that explores methods for growth-factor delivery, such as gene therapy, for restoring periodontal tissue loss. His continuously-funded National Institutes of Health research program focuses on oral and periodontal regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized medicine. He also serves as the co-principal investigator of the NIH-funded Michigan-Pittsburgh-Wyss Regenerative Medicine Resource Center. Additionally, he is the former editor in chief of the Journal of Dental Research, the official journal of the International Association for Dental Research.“Will Giannobile is that rare clinician-scientist who excels in both the science and practice of dentistry. His distinctive scientific accomplishments, combined with his strong leadership experience and reputation at Michigan, across the U.S., and throughout the world, ideally prepare him to lead a distinguished school of dental medicine like Harvard,” Laurie McCauley, dean of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, said.Giannobile has been recognized for his teaching and research with several accolades. In 2003, he received the Henry Russel, Jr. Faculty Award for Excellence in Research and Teaching from the University of Michigan. He is also a recipient of the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Academy of Periodontology. In 2018, he was recognized with the American Dental Association’s Norton M. Ross Award for Excellence in Clinical Research.In announcing Giannobile’s appointment, Daley expressed gratitude to the search committee and to those in the HSDM community who contributed their valuable input to the process. He also thanked Vicki Rosen, co-chair of the committee, and interim HSDM dean.“I’m delighted to welcome Will as the new dean of HSDM. I know he will bring an exciting new vision to HSDM,” said Rosen. “As an alumnus who is familiar with the HSDM community, he knows the School’s distinctive history and is well-poised to shape its future. I’m looking forward to working with him in the months ahead.”The new dean takes the helm at a time when HSDM will enroll its most diverse predoctoral class in recent history. An important focus of the School is to advance diversity, inclusion, and belonging, and encourage those underrepresented in health care to consider careers in dentistry.“Dr. Giannobile arrives at the Dental School with a strong reputation for supporting the entry and advancement of diverse students, trainees, faculty, and staff,” said Joan Reede, HMS dean for diversity and community partnership. “I extend a warm welcome and look forward to future collaborations between HSDM and the Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership that bring us closer to actualizing our shared missions and values.”“An important goal of mine will be to help support our amazing students for their success during their time of attending one of the very best institutions for dental education and oral health research in the world,” said Giannobile. William V. Giannobile, an educator and leader in the field of periodontology and an internationally recognized scholar in oral regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and precision medicine, has been named dean of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM). The appointment was announced today by Harvard Medical School (HMS) Dean George Q. Daley.Giannobile is an alumnus of HSDM, with an advanced degree in periodontology and oral biology (D.M.Sc. ’96). He completed his postdoctoral training in molecular biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and HMS. Giannobile served as an HSDM faculty member and worked at the affiliated Forsyth Institute early in his career.Giannobile is the Najjar Endowed Professor and Chair of the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. He has served as chair of the department for the past eight years and is also a professor of biomedical engineering in the university’s College of Engineering.“I am thrilled to welcome Will back to the Harvard School of Dental Medicine and the Longwood Medical Area,” said Daley. “Having roots in our community and experience as a passionate and productive leader of a major department at a premier dental school make him perfectly suited to take the helm at HSDM during this unprecedented time. Our Medical and Dental Schools are inextricably linked, and I look forward to Will’s partnership toward our shared mission of improving health for all through education, research, and service.”Giannobile will assume the role of HSDM dean on Sept. 1, succeeding Bruce Donoff, who stepped down at the end of 2019 after serving 28 years in the post.“The Harvard School of Dental Medicine is an extraordinary institution with a remarkable history of advancing research and education in service to humanity,” said Harvard President Larry Bacow. “We are so pleased to welcome Will Giannobile, a leader who will help to ensure the School’s continued success as we seek more opportunities to support and expand the work of the University’s diversely talented biomedical community.” “His distinctive scientific accomplishments, combined with his strong leadership experience and reputation at Michigan, across the U.S., and throughout the world, ideally prepare him to lead a distinguished school of dental medicine like Harvard.” — Laurie McCauley, Dean of the University of Michigan School of Dentistrylast_img read more

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Tony Committee Weighs in On Eligibility for On Your Feet! & More

first_imgThe Tony Awards Administration Committee met today for the second time this season to determine the eligibility of six Broadway productions for the 2016 Tony Awards. The committee will meet a total of four times (twice more) throughout the 2015-2016 season to decide the eligibility for the 70th Annual Tony Awards, which will take place on June 12, 2016 at the Beacon Theatre.The productions discussed were King Charles III, On Your Feet!, Allegiance, A View from the Bridge, Misery and China Doll.The committee made the following determinations:Tim Pigott-Smith will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play category for his performance in King Charles III.Ana Villafañe and Josh Segarra will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actress/Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical categories for their respective performances in On Your Feet!.Telly Leung and Lea Salonga will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actor/Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical categories for their respective performances in Allegiance.Donyale Werle and Darrel Maloney will be considered jointly eligible in the Best Scenic Design of a Musical category for their work in Allegiance.Phoebe Fox, Russell Tovey, Michael Zegen, Michael Gould and Richard Hansell will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actor/Actress in a Featured Role in a Play categories for their respective performances in A View from the Bridge.All other eligibility rulings were consistent with opening night billing.The committee met previously in November to determine the eligbility rules for 10 shows, including Hamilton and Spring Awakening. View Commentslast_img read more

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February 1, 2006 News and Notes

first_img February 1, 2006 News & Notes February 1, 2006 News and Notes News and Notes Derek Bruce of GrayRobinson in Orlando was appointed to the 2006 board of governors and executive board for the Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce. Barbara Anne Eagan spoke at the 2005 Community Collaborative Planning Conference in Orlando. Her topic was “High Priority Measures for Environmental Protection in the Rapidly Growing Community.” Martin Alexander of Holland & Knight in West Palm Beach was appointed to the Rules Committee of the Southern District of Florida, and elected chair of the board of directors of Children’s Harbor. Kimberly Kolback moderated the panel “Sports Collective Bargaining Agreements and Government’s New Role” during the 17th Annual Southern Regional Entertainment and Sports Law Conference and the 11th Annual Intellectual Property Law Institute Conference. Harvey V. Cohen of Cohen Battisti was interviewed by Danny Ramos on Hispanic Achievers TV on Orange TV channel 9 about his volunteer efforts to assist juveniles who are being prosecuted. David C. Goodwin of Akerman Senterfitt in Miami was the featured speaker at a seminar on the topic of “Succeeding in Federal Court: What You Need to Know About Rules and Procedures.” Judge Frank Orlando of Tampa was named chair of the board for AMI, which operates over 54 schools nationally for adjudicated teens. David B. Canning of GrayRobinson in Orlando was appointed to the 2006 board of directors for the East Orlando Chamber of Commerce. Bruce Charles King of Carlton Fields in Miami spoke at the “Averting Chaos on the Job Site: Proactively Understanding Components of a Good Contract” seminar for the National Business Institute. His topic was “Identifying Key Contractual Issues, Clauses, and Provisions That Could Derail or Postpone a Project.” Tom Edwards of Peek, Cobb, Edwards & Ashton was inducted president of the Jacksonville chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates. Bruce J. Berman, a partner in the Miami office of McDermott Will & Emery LLP, recently completed the 2006 edition of Florida Civil Procedure, published by West Group and released in December. Rep. Dorothy L. Hukill, R-Port Orange, was awarded the President’s Award from the Florida Prosecuting Attorney’s Association. Mark K. Eckels of Boyd & Jenerette in Jacksonville was admitted to the Georgia Bar. Ruden McClosky has established the Ruden McClosky Diversity Scholarship Program to encourage racial and ethnic minority students to attend law school and to provide financial assistance to these students. Douglas A. Kelly of Holland & Knight in Orlando was elected vice president of the board of directors of the Central Florida Bankruptcy Law Association for 2006. Jason C. Hill of Arnstein & Lehr in West Beach was named to the board of directors for Seagull Industries for the Disabled. Cari L. Roth of Bryant Miller Olive was appointed to a four-year term on the state’s Environmental Regulation Commission by Gov. Jeb Bush. Richard McAlpin of McAlpin & Brais presented “Product Liability for Yacht Designers and Marine Engineers” at the IBEX 2005 Conference. Mitchell L. Lundeen of George, Hartz, Lundeen, Fulmer, Johnstone, King & Stevens was elected president of the Miami-Dade chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates. Betty L. Dunkum of Trial Practices in West Palm Beach received the ABA Section of Litigation’s Outstanding Newsletter Editor Award for her work on The Woman Advocate Newsletter during the 2004-2005 term. She was also appointed co-chair of the ABA Woman Advocate Subcommittee on Balancing Work and Home for the 2005-2006 term. Wendy Smith Hansen gave a presentation on “Florida Laws and Rules Regulating the Practice of Podiatric Medicine” at the Florida Podiatric Medical Association’s Annual Scientific and Management Symposium in Orlando. Lyndel Anne Mason of Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, spoke at the morning loan and credit officers’ meeting at Riverside Bank of Central Florida on the topic of “The New Bankruptcy Law and Its Impact on Lenders.” Armando J. Bucelo, Jr., of Miami was elected chair of the board of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation. Edward Delano Sullivan of Ft. Lauderdale was elected to serve as governor general for the term 2005-2008 at the Triennial Congress of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants in Plymouth, MA. Bowman Brown of Shutts & Bowen was honored with the Judges’ Special Award from The Beacon Council in Miami-Dade County. James F. Johnston of GrayRobinson has been appointed to the 2006 board of directors for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Lara Donlon of the Law Offices of Glen J. Torcivia and Associates served on the legal panel at the 11 th A nnual Governmental Symposium sponsored by Rachlin, Cohen & Holtz where she spoke on “Overtime Pay for Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees During Hurricanes and Emergencies.” Lawrence G. Walters of Weston, Garrou, DeWitt & Walters presented seminars on Internet Age Verification to the Association of Sites Advocating Child Protection in Los Angeles, CA, and at the Internext Expo in Las Vegas. Gregory D. Snell of Snell Legal in Ormond Beach was appointed by the City Commission of Ormond Beach to the Ormond Beach Board of Adjustments and Appeals. Mark A. DiAntonio of Pallo, Marks & Hernandez in Palm Beach Gardens served as contributing editor for The Fair Labor Standards Act: 2005 Cumulative Supplement published by BNA Books in conjunction with the ABA Section of Labor and Employment Law. Steven W. Zelkowitz of GrayRobinson was a special guest on North Miami Chamber News where he discussed the North Miami Community Redevelopment Agency. Anthony F. Sos of Dellecker, Wilson, King, McKenna & Ruffier served as a faculty presenter for a seminar on “Nursing Home Negligence in Florida” offered by Lorman Education Services. Stanley B. Price and Carter N. McDowell of Bilzin Sumberg in Miami were honored by the Builders Association of South Florida. Price was named to the BASF Hall of Fame as the recipient of the organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award and McDowell received the President’s Award. Milton Hirsch of Milton Hirsch PLLC spoke at the Cardozo Law School’s “Intensive Trial Advocacy Program” in New York. Christian Petersen of Gunster Yoakley in Ft. Lauderdale was inducted as a board member of the L.A. Lee Family YMCA of Broward County. Mark J. Neuberger of Buchanan Ingersoll in Miami was selected as a recipient of the 2006 American Diabetes Association’s Valor Award. Guy S. Haggard of GrayRobinson in Orlando was appointed to the board of directors of the West Orange Airport Authority by the Orange County Commission. James L. Wilkes II of Tampa was inducted as a fellow into the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. Julie H. Littky-Rubin of Lytal, Reiter, Clark, Fountain & Williams in West Palm Beach was appointed by the Supreme Court of Florida to serve a two-year term on its Standard Civil Jury Instructions Committee. Michael S. Greene of Akerman Senterfitt in Miami taught a university-accredited course on mold prevention at Florida Atlantic University’s School of Construction Safety and Architectural Engineering. Leonard E. Mondschein of Mondschein and Mondschein presented “Elder Law Update” at FICPA’s Estate and Financial Planning Conference in Ft. Lauderdale. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese of the Law Offices of J. Kelly Kennedy in Winter Haven has become an authorized speaker for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines and Princess Cruise Lines. Michael R. Goldstein of Akerman Senterfitt in Miami office was appointed to the advisory board of the Environmental Due Diligence Guide, a publication of the Bureau of National Affairs. Kathleen S. McLeroy of Carlton Fields in Tampa was elected president-elect of Bay Area Legal Services, Inc., for 2006. Anita R. Geraci of GrayRobinson was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush to the Fifth Circuit Judicial Nominating Committee. Michael J. Faehner of Abel Band in Sarasota was elected to the board of directors of the American Cancer Society’s Sarasota Unit. Maria T. Currier of Hunton & Williams has been reappointed outside general counsel for the South Florida Hospital & Healthcare Association. Lisa Polak Edgar was elected to serve as chair for the Florida Public Service Commission for a two-year term. Edgar was appointed to the commission by Gov. Jeb Bush. Leslie J. Croland of Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge in Ft. Lauderdale has been elected to the board of directors and the executive committee of the Museum of Art, Ft. Lauderdale. Kathleen W. Schoenberg of Delray Beach recently spoke on “Charter School Governance and Legal Issues” at the 2005 Florida Charter School Conference hosted by the Florida Department of Education.last_img read more

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Sewer delay could be much more costly

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Let’s play “kick the can down the road.”Years ago, the Ballston Town Sewer District proposal was turned down. At that time, it could have been done at a reasonable cost. Yes, it’s expensive. But the cost is only going to rise considerably in the future. Do we kick the can down the road to our children? Someday, maybe sooner than later, the state may take issue with us sending our poo down toward Ballston Lake and the Alplaus. If the state Department of Environmental Conservation drops the hammer on us, we will find a whole new meaning to the word expensive.Robert R. YoungBurnt HillsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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Have a good cry but no boozing: Expert tips for virus-stressed China

first_imgFeeling stressed by the deadly coronavirus? Have a good cry, say Chinese health experts. If that does not work, buy a punching bag for the office or try singing. The advice for people in China struggling mentally to cope with the virus comes as schools and businesses delay reopening this week to help contain the spread of the SARS-like pathogen that has claimed more than 420 lives.With public attractions closed, events cancelled and citizens urged to stay home to avoid infections over the extended Spring Festival break, their psychological health is coming under the spotlight. “After crying, you will feel better (…) An overcast sky will only brighten up after a heavy downpour,” he added when asked for advice for frontline workers battling the virus.Otherwise, employees can install a sandbag in their office and spend several minutes doing some punching exercises to relax, he said.His comments were met with some amusement online, with one user on China’s Twitter-like platform Weibo saying: “Surely we can’t be crying all day.”Chinese citizens are receiving advice on all fronts on how to act responsibly as well.A banner at the Beijing West Railway Station reminds people to “strengthen protection, stay calm, believe in science and avoid spreading rumors”.Another outside a Beijing housing estate urges residents to “avoid going out, wear a mask, keep a distance with others and don’t shake hands”.Jingles on television and radio remind people to wash their hands regularly, on top of round-the-clock updates online from the central city of Wuhan where the virus was detected late last year.China’s state broadcaster has been livestreaming the construction of two new hospitals in the virus epicenter, turning viewers into “online supervisors”, Xinhua reported on Sunday.As people spend more time cooped up at home, hashtags detailing their boredom have made the rounds on Weibo as well, making light of the dire situation.One of them, titled “Dad has finally been driven nuts”, was viewed 440 million times, with 120,000 discussion posts.These included video clips of family members playing badminton indoors while wearing surgical masks.Another hashtag — “how bored can you be when staying at home” — had more than 80 million views.One user wrote: “This is the 10th day I have stayed home, and I can’t tell what day it is or whether it is day or night.”Another user posted photographs of a Mickey Mouse sculpture apparently made from the husks of seeds and nuts.In a bid to curb the spread of the virus, China has restricted travel and effectively locked down most of Hubei province — where the majority of deaths and infections have been reported — for almost two weeks.But experts were quick to urge citizens not to turn to drinking or gaming to pass the time at home.Chen Xuefeng of the Chinese Academy of Sciences said this week: “When avoiding going outside these days, people can relieve stress by exercising indoors, singing and so on.””Drinking and gaming for long hours is not good for stress and could bring about worse emotional pressure,” she said. Topics :center_img There is also growing concern over the well-being of healthcare workers on the frontline as the number of infections rises above 20,400. Some provinces, such as Anhui in the east, have set up 24-hour hotlines for people mentally affected by the epidemic to talk to psychologists or psychiatrists, said state news agency Xinhua.Health experts have offered suggestions on how to deal with the “extraordinary circumstances”.”If your emotions have been particularly suppressed, you can look for an isolated spot and have a good cry for a few minutes,” said Yang Fude of the Beijing Huilongguan Hospital.last_img read more

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Kenya opens Chinese-built railway line

first_imgThe extension links to the $3.2 billionline between the port of Mombasa and Nairobi that opened in 2017, alsosuffering from underutilization of its cargo services. Both sections wereChinese-funded and Chinese-built. The development of Kenya’s railways hasbeen part of China’s “One Belt, One Road” initiative, a multi-billion dollarseries of infrastructure projects upgrading land and maritime trade routesbetween China and Europe, Asia and Africa. (Reuters) The boxy red-and-white diesel train left from a gleaming new terminal in the port city of Mombasa, carrying Kenyatta, Chinese dignitaries and citizens from around the country on its maiden journey to Nairobi, Kenya. THECITIZENcenter_img NAIROBI – Kenya’s President UhuruKenyatta is due to open a new $1.5 billion Chinese rail line on Wednesdaylinking the capital Nairobi to the Rift Valley town of Naivasha, despite delaysin establishing an industrial park there to drive freight traffic.last_img read more

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No eyes? No problem: Marine creature expands boundaries of vision

first_imgLaboratory experiments indicated thebrittle stars have rudimentary vision. Placed in a circular arena, they movedtoward walls that were white with a black bar, suggestive of a daytime hidingplace. Brittle stars, with five radiating armsextending from a central disk, are related to starfish (also called sea stars),sea cucumbers, sea urchins, and others in a group of marine invertebratescalled echinoderms. They have a nervous system but no brain. Researchers said on Thursday that thered brittle star, called Ophiocoma wendtii, is only the second creature knownto be able to see without having eyes – known as extraocular vision –joining asingle species of sea urchin. It possesses this exotic capabilitythanks to light-sensing cells, called photoreceptors, covering its body andpigment cells, called chromatophores that move during the day to facilitate theanimal’s dramatic color change from a deep reddish-brown in daytime to stripybeige at nighttime. “It’s such an alien concept for us, asvery visually driven animals, to conceive of how an animal might see itshabitat without eyes, but now we know of two examples,” Sumner-Rooney added. (Reuters) The red brittle star – up to about 14inches (35 centimeters) from arm tip to arm tip – lives in bright and complexhabitats, with high predation threats from reef fish. It stays hidden duringdaytime – making the ability to spot a safe place to hide critical – and comesout at night to feed on detritus. Its photoreceptors are surrounded duringdaytime by chromatophores that narrow the field of the light being detected,making each photoreceptor like the pixel of a computer image that, whencombined with other pixels, makes a whole image. The visual system does notwork at night, when the chromatophores contract. A red brittle star, Ophiocoma wendtii, is seen in this image released on January 2, 2020. REUTERS “If our conclusions about thechromatophores are correct, this is a beautiful example of innovation inevolution,” said Lauren Sumner-Rooney, a research fellow at Oxford UniversityMuseum of Natural History who led the study published in the journal CurrentBiology. Another scenario showed they were notsimply detecting brightness versus darkness. When they were presented with graywalls making it so no part of the arena was lighter or darker overall, theystill moved toward the black stripe, which was centered on a white stripe so asto reflect the same amount of light as the gray. WASHINGTON – A cousin of the starfishthat resides in the coral reefs of the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico lacks eyes,but can still see.last_img read more

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Women’s Big Bash League: Deandra Dottin suffers cheekbone fractures

first_imgWEST Indies women all-rounder Deandra Dottin has suffered multiple cheekbone fractures after a collision on the field during the Women’s Big Bash League game between Brisbane Heat and Melbourne Stars. However, she insisted “all is going to be fine!” in a post on Facebook.“Eye socket and eyesight fine, jaw and teeth fine,” Dottin wrote. “I am out of hospital now, recovering before a specialist appointment with a face surgeon Thursday (today). At this stage it is believed I will require titanium plates to fix the issues.”The Cricket Australia website reported Dottin, who plays for Heat, would check in with Brisbane Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon Dr John Arvier to finalise a timeline for her recovery.Dottin suffered the injury at Allan Border Field on Tuesday. In the 11th over, with Stars chasing 130, Meg Lanning hit seamer Haidee Birkett over midwicket. Dottin and Laura Harris were the fielders in the deep and, while trying to prevent the ball from crossing the boundary, they crashed into each other. Dottin seemed to land awkwardly on a kit bag and was stretchered off the field by medical staff. Harris was thrown into the picket fence, but she felt well enough to remain at the ground though she didn’t take any further part in the match, which Heat won by five runs.This incident came a day after Heat’s Holly Ferling suffered a concussion from her head striking the turf hard while trying to take a catch.She was not able to play Tuesday’s game as a result.last_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_img August 10, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditPANTHERS-TALLON OUTDale Tallon, after 10 seasons, out as Florida Panthers’ GMUNDATED (AP) — The Florida Panthers will have a new general manager next season, making the announcement that Dale Tallon is leaving the franchise after 10 years. The entire three-game series between Pittsburgh and St. Louis at Busch Stadium has been postponed. There have been 27 games postponed by Major League Baseball because of the coronavirus, 13 of them involving the Cardinals. Eight St. Louis players in total have tested positive, including star catcher Yadier Molina.BLUE JAYSToronto at temporary home Tuesday Tallon’s contract as president of hockey operations and general manager expired July 1, and was extended by Panthers owner Vincent Viola to get through the remainder of a season that was stretched out by the coronavirus pandemic. The Panthers were eliminated from the playoffs on Friday, falling to the New York Islanders in four games. Another season of high expectations that didn’t deliver as planned sealed Tallon’s fate.PIRATES-CARDINALS-POSTPONEDMore cancellations for the CardinalsPITTSBURGH (AP) — The Cardinals haven’t played since July 30 because of virus concerns and now will have to wait even longer before getting back on the field. Update on the latest sports CHAMPIONS LEAGUE-VIRUSTesting for UEFA leader will allow trophy presentationsLISBON (AP) — UEFA President Aleksander Čeferin will undergo testing for the coronavirus that will allow him to present the Champions League trophy to the winners. Ceferin and general secretary Theodore Theodoridis will be tested two days before the finals of Europe’s three club competitions this month so they can hand over the medals and trophies. Some competitions during the pandemic have seen players have to collect their own medals, including at the FA Cup final in England. The men’s Champions League final is in Lisbon, Portugal on Aug. 23 — two days after the Europa League concludes in Cologne, Germany.center_img Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. (AP)— The Athletics try for their 10th straight win when they start a series on the road against the Angeles. In the meantime, outfielder Ramon Laureano and the A’s — along with the Houston Astros — will see if Major League Baseball will issue any discipline for their dust-up. Laureano charged toward Houston bench coach Álex Cintrón after being hit by a pitch Sunday at the Coliseum. Astros catcher Dustin Garneau left the dugout to tackle Laureano as the benches emptied. Players who were sitting in the seats, observing COVID-19 social-distancing protocols, also rushed onto the field. The skirmish came months after Houston’s sign-stealing scandal was brought to light by Oakland pitcher Mike Fiers.VIRUS OUTBREAK-COLLEGE SPORTS Players unite in push to save college season, create unionUNDATED (AP) — College football players from across the country united Sunday in an attempt to save their season and ensure they’ll no longer be left out of the sport’s biggest decisions. Numerous players from Florida State to Oregon posted a graphic on social media with #WeWantToPlay and #WeAreUnited. Michigan defensive back Hunter Reynolds says, “Every athlete, I’m pretty sure, wants to play their sports. They just want to do so safely.” Not only do they want to play, they want to create a players association for college football. UNDATED (AP) — The Toronto Blue Jays’ first game in their temporary home of Buffalo will be Tuesday night against Miami. Buffalo’s Sahlen Field is their new home for the rest of the season, being that they’re barred from playing in Toronto this year because of health concerns over the coronavirus. Sahlen Field is the ballpark of their Triple-A affiliate. ASTROS-ATHLETICSAstros, A’s clear benches, empty seats; Oak wins 9th in rowlast_img read more

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Zak: Andersen and Badgers traversed well through transition

first_imgSometime Saturday night, Melvin Gordon ran in his third touchdown of the game, a 13-yard scamper where the sophomore went untouched, his cut-back quickness seemingly all he needed to score. It increased Wisconsin’s lead to 25, at 42-17 with little more than five minutes left in the third quarter.Around that same time, around 600 miles away, Bret Bielema’s Arkansas team was finishing up against top-ranked Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Bielema’s team was trounced 52-0, their fifth-straight defeat, solidifying them as the placemat of the SEC West at 0-4.Karma? No, definitely not. A sign of the difficulty that comes with a coaching change? Undoubtedly, yes.It was never going to be easy trekking for Bielema in his first season at Arkansas, even if their 3-0 record to begin the season made things seem otherwise. He was inheriting a 4-8 team from last season and competing in the toughest division in the toughest conference in college football. The optimism was undeservedly high, but that’s usually just the way it is.And the rough start is also usually just the way it is. In a system where players come and go, sustainability of coaches remains vital to the success of a program. Replacing one coach with another generally reveals an inherent transition period where wins and losses aren’t the only thing judging success. Only a handful of cases conclude differently. It’s just not a simple endeavor.And that’s why Gary Andersen’s takeover of the Wisconsin program is impressive. Life after Bielema was inevitable and never promised to be pleasant.As Gordon ran for those three scores and his partner in crime James White tallied three of his own, it was another sign that the Wisconsin football program didn’t take a step back when Bielema elected to leave for southern pastures. The win over Illinois resembled the type of wins seen from the teams Bielema coached to three consecutive conference championships. It made this season seem much less like a zone of transition.The running game forced the issue against a less-than-stellar Illini defense; Joel Stave made enough throws to move the chains and the defense — although spotty at times without proclaimed leader Chris Borland — really kept Illinois from holding much hope.It was a rather ho-hum victory with a rather ho-hum attendance of less than 50,000 — many of them wearing cardinal red — making for a rather ho-hum primetime experience at Memorial Stadium. But in the end, that was sort of the expectation.It was widely anticipated that Wisconsin would roll over the Illini — losers of 16 straight conference games, a new school record — just like they have over the past few years and just like they treated many other Big Ten opponents during Bielema’s tenure.Through seven games, Wisconsin has won convincingly and lost heartbreakingly, and they’ve also made it impossible to argue there has been a drop off. This is a testament to many facets of the program where, obviously, head coach sits at the top of the list.But in addition to Andersen, there are plenty of faces he could thank for the program’s transitional stability. Athletic Director Barry Alvarez is one, commandeering the Rose Bowl preparation and then handing the keys to Andersen on Jan. 2, one day after Wisconsin lost to Stanford.This was more important than it would normally seem. Bielema left on December 4, 2012, and less than a month later, on January 3, 2013, five new assistants had already been hired.In leaving, Bielema sliced up a puzzle and rearranged the pieces, grabbing assistant after assistant with him, but it didn’t take long for Andersen to fit them back together. His early presence on campus and interactions with the team is an aspect many UW players look back to.“It was nice to have the coaches in here in January, and be able to work with them for eight months before the season really started,” senior linebacker Ethan Armstrong said. “It was definitely a benefit and helped make it a smoother transition.”Armstrong noted the transition period is very much real, and the team is still feeling its way through everything, one week at a time. Things were never going to be perfect. The obstacles were out there, and Ohio State and Arizona State served as temporary obstructions, but at this point, those blocks seem minor.Andersen and his staff came in, seemingly changing nothing but the color of the helmets once in a while and Wisconsin football has remained exactly that.This outward view is easy and hindsight is even easier. Yes, the Wisconsin program was always in good shape, but it isn’t by mistake that Wisconsin didn’t drop off much, if at all, from the conference championship pace of 2010-2012. That’s something not many programs can do. The examples are out there in the form of schools like USC and Florida.Now, more than halfway through the first season of the Andersen era, it might be more important to note that instead of seeing a pair of heartbreaking losses and Wisconsin flubs in primetime, things could definitely be much worse. That coach at Arkansas could tell you this.Sean Zak is a senior majoring in journalism and communication arts. How do you think the program has fared since Andersen took over? Let him know with an email to szak@badgerherald.com or with a tweet to @sean_zak.last_img read more

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