Tell the government it has to play a leading role

first_imgAdvertisement As part of the next phase of the consultation, the Minister is encouraging Canadians to share their stories and their advice.Please take the time to engage so performers like you are part of this important process.There are different ways to take part:Register on the government’s consultation website so you can submit ideas and support positive proposals;Click here to read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact;Click here to submit your thoughts on how to promote, support and address Canadian Content in a Digital World;Support strong arguments and positive ideas. You can “vote” for positive ideas and comment on inspiring stories: on the challenges of digital transformation, on supporting artists, on promoting creativity and on what Canadian content means for you;Stay tuned for other events you can take part in, either in person or via social media.Think about the issues and what resonates with you then respond with your own priorities and thoughts.The government is seeking input on three questions:How do we support Canada’s artists, content creators and cultural entrepreneurs in order to create a cultural ecosystem in which they thrive and that will benefit the growth of our middle class at home, and help them reach beyond our borders?Dedicated creative talent combined with government investment and balanced regulation has created a world-class creative industry here in Canada;The core of the Broadcasting Act has always been a legislated commitment that Canada’s broadcasting system should be owned and controlled by Canadians, and operated for the benefit of Canadian people. These values have been key to Canada’s success; Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, has launched the next phase of consultation into Canada’s cultural and creative economy in this Digital Age.This is an opportunity to advocate for progressive policies that build our sector, create jobs and put Canadian stories on our screens.More urgently, this is our chance to push back against the critics who want to tear down Canada’s cultural policies. Recent decisions from bodies like the CRTC have been eroding the approach that’s helped to build a world-class industry. This consultation is an opportunity to embrace the key role creative talent plays and ensure balanced regulation is there to support them.center_img “The engine that drives Canada’s creative economy is work that’s written, directed, produced and performed by Canadians. Canada’s creative economy won’t thrive unless government takes a leading role promoting Canada’s creative talent.”– ACTRA National President Ferne Downey Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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Studios Fight Back Against Withering Rotten Tomatoes Scores

first_img Login/Register With: The power of the “Tomatometer” has reached a tipping point as critics screenings inch closer and closer to openings and movies try to avoid the dreaded green splat.The Emoji Movie‘s $24.5 million domestic opening during the July 28 to 30 weekend accomplished what no other movie has been able to do during a tough summer season at the box office — survive an abysmal Rotten Tomatoes score (7 percent) and open in line with prerelease tracking.One possible secret weapon? Sony wouldn’t let reviews post until midday on July 27, hours before the pic began playing in previews before rolling out everywhere. Sony, like every studio, is looking for their own basket of rotten eggs to throw at review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes in hopes of combating a bad “Tomatometer” score. That means screening some titles later and later for critics.“What other wide release with a score under 8 percent has opened north of $20 million? I don’t think there is one,” says Josh Greenstein, Sony Pictures president of worldwide marketing and distribution. “The Emoji Movie was built for people under 18, so we wanted to give the movie its best chance.” Facebook Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement READ MORE Advertisementlast_img read more

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Canadian actress Amanda Brugel becomes series regular on The Handmaids Tale

first_imgHer character in The Handmaid’s Tale is a household servant known as a Martha who becomes close to the main character Offred, played by Elisabeth Moss.The story is set in a male-dominated, totalitarian society ruled by a fundamentalist regime that treats women as property of the state. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Offred is one of the “handmaids” forced to bear children for a commander and his infertile wife.Joseph Fiennes plays Offred’s commander alongside Yvonne Strahovski as his wife.The cast also includes Samira Wiley of Orange Is the New Black, Alexis Bledel of Gilmore Girlsand Max Minghella of The Social Network.The Toronto-shot Hulu series airs on Bravo in Canada and was renewed for a second season in May.The entire first season also launched on Bell Media’s streaming service CraveTV in the spring.The Handmaid’s Tale recently earned 13 Emmy Award nominations, including Best Drama Series.By VICTORIA AHEARN Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img Facebook Advertisement Amanda Brugel, the lone Canadian cast member in Season 1 of The Handmaid’s Tale, has been promoted to series regular for the upcoming second season.Brugel, who hails from Pointe Claire, Quebec, plays Rita in the series that’s based on Toronto author Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel.Brugel’s other credits include Kim’s Convenience, Eyewitness and Orphan Black. Twitterlast_img read more

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The NEW ACTOR CORE GROUP – 2018

first_imgAdvertisement The NEW ACTOR CORE GROUP – 2018The world of film and television is an ever-changing landscape. How content is made and how it is consumed has radically changed over the last 10 years and so has an actor’s place.Even though the talent and skill of an actor are still to be improved on a continuous basis, the way an actor can enter the industry is expanding and widening. More avenues are now accessible for an actor to enter. Simultaneously more content is being made and those who hold the purse strings for producing content are no longer the elite few. All the while, more and more people are consuming content on a daily basis and all because of the power of digital recording and the internet. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter Facebook Login/Register With: For 2018, the Actor Core Group is for those actors who have come to realize that an actor must be a producer and not just an actor. I challenge you to look up 10 of your favourite actors on IMDb.com and see how many of them are also producers. Always the majority and often all of them are producers.The actor/producer is a unique cat. They have a perspective that a writer/producer doesn’t have. They bring a uniqueness to stories and characters and their boldness to move forward on their journey as an actor translates into the films and series they produce.I will be personally mentoring 8 actors in Canada this coming year to become producers. Yes, I will assist you with your acting skills and training regimen but moreover I will walk you through the process of becoming a producer of material designed to show your best work to the industry as an actor and that will stand out and be noticed by the biggest studios on the planet.Whether you have tried to produce a web series or short film that you could star in or not, this mentoring program will take you all the way to creating a high concept series developed to the point of being able to be pitched to Netflix or AMC or MGM or Amazon or Apple or Facebook or YouTube or Warner Bros. or Universal or HBO or…. I know, the list is long. And with the current boom in content production around the world, now is the time for you to become a real player in this game of entertainment. The time truly is now and here’s why:STUDIO US $ FOR PRODUCTION IN2018 (estimated)Netflix $8,000,000,000.00Amazon $6,000,000,000.00Apple $1,000,000,000.00Facebook $3,000,000.00 perepisode (# ofepisodes not known)And these are the non-traditional film studios. So this is in addition to the budgets that will be spent by HBO, AMC, MGM, Warner Bros., Sony, Fox, NBC, CBS, CBC, Space, FX, etc.These numbers are saying that CONTENT IS WANTED. And who better to create content than an actor who knows how to produce?There is a way to do this. I have done it and I have helped others do it. I have assisted 2 actors in making their own web series, one of which turned into a regular series episodes of 24 minutes and one of which is being developed into a regular series to be pitched to the studios. I have assisted three actors to develop and produce their own short films winning several awards. I personally have produced close to 90 episodes of TV – drama and comedy and animation. I have created and developed a high-concept TV series that is being co-produced by Original Pictures Inc. (Fargo, Dirk Gently, Constant Gardener, etc.) that is being considered right now by MGM and AMC and will soon be going to Netflix.I will take this hard-won knowledge of the content creation landscape and mentor you every step of the way to creating your very own vehicle to get your acting career off the ground and into the skies.You must have a strong interest in acting and producing and communicate to me what your understanding is of the benefits of doing such a program. I want to know your goals and your aspirations and what you feel you can achieve in the next year and how much work you can put into this program. Those with the strongest drive and motivation to make the most of this program will be accepted. We will start in February of 2018 but I urge you to apply now as actor/producer potentials will be accepted as the applications come in for there is some study to do before we start in February.To apply, simply email me your story paying particular attention to the last paragraph. neilthedirector@me.comNEIL SCHELLlast_img read more

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONSAPPEL DE SOUMISSION – 2019 CANADIAN ARTS FASHION AWARDS

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Don’t miss out! Applications open until December 31st 2018!https://cafawards.ca/about/applications/ Login/Register With: Twittercenter_img Advertisement Advertisement THIS NOTICE IS IN ENGLISH AND FRENCHCET AVIS EST EN ANGLAIS ET EN FRANÇAISAPPLY NOW and don’t miss out on the opportunity to be a nominee at the 2019 Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards!We are excited to share that this year 16 of our 2019 award categories will now be self-nominating. To ensure that everyone has the opportunity to be considered, CAFA is offering Canadians across all fashion industry categories the opportunity to participate in the process. INSCRIVEZ-VOUS MAINTENANT!Nous sommes ravis de vous annoncer que cette année, 16 de nos catégories de prix 2019 seront désormais auto-nominées. Afin de s’assurer que tout le monde a la possibilité d’être pris en compte, CAFA offre aux Canadiens de toutes les catégories de l’industrie de la mode la possibilité de participer au processus.Dépêchez-vous, la période d’inscription se termine le 31 décembre 2018!https://cafawards.ca/a-propos-de-la-cafa/applications/…last_img read more

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MONTREAL FLAUNTS HEAVY METAL CREDENTIALS AS CITY HOSTS ROCK FESTIVAL

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment MONTREAL — The Montreal city councillor who spearheaded a motion last April to formally designate the city a headbangers’ paradise says the reaction to the gesture has been remarkable.“A lot of people are talking about it — people in the city, metalheads around the world,” said Coun. Craig Sauve, a musician and heavy metal buff.“People are very appreciative of the recognition — particularly in the metal scene, where metalheads feel like their culture is not respected and cast aside.” Advertisement Login/Register With: Those official credentials as a heavy metal “city of excellence” will be on full display this weekend as it plays host to the 10th edition of Heavy Montreal — a popular two-day metal and rock festival held on a small island near the city.While the designation didn’t come with any financial perks, observers are confident the “positive vibe” it created will bring big dividends for up-and-coming local acts.“It helps fill up the bars, it helps the promoters and it helps the bands,” says Montrealer Jimmy Kay, who runs Metal Voice, a YouTube channel that reports on heavy metal music. “Now when I interview bands, they know about it, they’ve heard about it.”Quebec bands that eventually found their way to Montreal did so for a variety of reasons, but the common denominator was a loyal and knowledgeable fan base packing the venues.“When you talk to bands that have been around for 30, 40 years … if it wasn’t for Montreal, they wouldn’t exist today, because that’s where everyone wanted to hear them,” Kay said. “The fans were there for them always.”Daniel Glick, director of concerts and events at concert promoter Evenko, which puts on the popular Heavy Montreal event, says the firm promotes about 100 metal shows yearly. He called the city’s recognition a nice “stamp of approval.”“A lot of the metal bands and hard rock bands have done really, really well here over the years, if you go back to the early years — Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Metallica — Montreal is definitely one of their top markets,” Glick said. “It may have changed the way they did their live shows, the vibe here is definitely than going to another American or Canadian city. I think the fans are extremely passionate and respectful at the same time, and that definitely leads to that relationship (with bands) that has gone back to beginning.”Rick Hughes knows that connection well from his years with local band Sword, which made its mark in the 1980s and continues to perform to this day. He says the kids who were at his shows decades ago are among the people still coming out today.The St-Bruno, Que., native said that after the band’s last Montreal show, fans hung out for two hours to get autographs. In talking to them the affable Hughes learned the young fans from the 1980s had gone on to become everything from engineers to pilots and businessmen. Some had brought along their own children to see his band play.“You only find that in metal, and the enthusiasm of the crowd in Montreal is unequalled,” Hughes said.Montreal’s scene included homegrown bands like Cryptopsy and Kataklysm, but it also drew from all over Quebec as talent arrived to hone their craft. Quebec’s most famous heavy metal outfit, Voivod, was formed in Jonquiere before moving to Montreal in the mid-1980s.Guitarist Daniel Mongrain, who currently plays in Voivod and has played extensively with other groups, said bands knew that being in Montreal was essential. “It was good to play in our local area, but we had to go to Montreal to meet other bands, that’s where the action was,” he said.An accomplished guitarist, Mongrain began playing guitar at age 11 after having seen a music video involving the original incarnation of Voivod on the French-language music channel Musique Plus.“I bought a guitar and wanted to be like them,” said Mongrain, known as Chewy, who is celebrating his 11th anniversary with Voivod.Mongrain, 43, originally from Trois-Riveres, Que., said the Montreal sound fans worldwide now recognize is really the creation of acts that got their start all over the province.“Montreal is symbolic of the rest of the province,” he said. “There’s a uniqueness to the sound of Montreal, but Montreal includes Rimouski, Rouyn-Noranada, Trois-Rivieres and Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean.”By the time he was playing regularly in the 1990s, the grunge movement was gaining popularity in the rock scene, and times were difficult for metalheads. There were no big metal festivals at the time, but Montreal fans remained loyal.“It was a small community, but every time there was a show, there was a bunch of people — like a brotherhood.” Mongrain said. “It was an underground scene that was very alive, but still very underground.”Hughes said recognition of Montreal’s heavy metal roots was overdue, placing it alongside jazz as a sound that has long helped define Montreal.“It’s music that ages well through its intensity — it isn’t pop, it isn’t the flavour of the day,” he said. “Jazz isn’t the flavour of the day — it’s stays the same, and metal is the same: It stays metal.”Sidhartha Banerjee ~ The Canadian Presscenter_img Advertisement Jimmy Kay, the host of Metal Voice, poses in the basement of his home in Montreal, Thursday, July 25, 2019. The Montreal city councillor who spearheaded a motion last April to formally designate the city a headbangers’ paradise says the reaction to the gesture has been remarkable. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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APTNs Political Panel discusses PIN messages transparency and Terry Nelson

first_imgAPTN National NewsAPTN National News has been bringing you stories about a loophole in Access-to-Information legislation, and how PIN-to-PIN messages on BlackBerries are slipping through the cracks. Now, the Political Panel sits down with anchor Michael Hutchinson to talk about the issue.Also, the Panel discusses former Roseau River First Nation chief Terry Nelson’s plan to address the Iranian Parliament.last_img

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Aboriginal Affairs cant produce data for onreserve First Nation student spending

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–The department of Aboriginal Affairs can’t say how much it spends per-student for on-reserve First Nation education.A department official told APTN National News the department didn’t have the data readily available showing how much the department spends on First Nations students attending schools on-reserve.APTN requested the information Wednesday.Earlier this week, in an effort to undercut First Nations leaders’ demand for more education funding, Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan released a series of numbers he said showed Ottawa gave more per-student for First Nations education than the provinces. Despite the government research, officials don’t have information on the amount of money spent on reserve students alone.Without that data, the numbers are misleading because they include how much Aboriginal Affairs spends on putting First Nations students into the provincial system, according to the Assembly of First Nation.  And that inclusion would inflate the department’s $13, 542 per-student figure because about 36 per cent of First Nations students attend provincial schools, said the AFN.The Assembly of First Nations says the department only spends $7,101 per student for on-reserve education.Statistics Canada says the average Canadian student receives $10, 439.The AFN claims there is an about $3 billion funding gap between on-reserve education and the rest of the country.A department and AFN commissioned blue-ribbon panel found that at least 100 on-reserve schools provided unhealthy learning environments for students.First Nations leaders gathered this week at an education summit in Gatineau, Que., across the Ottawa River from Parliament Hill. Chiefs rejected the Harper government’s plan to introduce legislation on First Nations education and are now mulling a plan of action that could include blockades or an occupation of Parliament Hill.last_img read more

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Two suspects in Tricia Boisvert killing now in police custody

first_imgAPTN National NewsPolice say the last man wanted in connection to the January death of Tricia Boisvert, a metis woman from Montreal, turned himself into police Thursday.James Boucher, 31, is charged with accessary after the fact and committing an indignity to a human body said Montreal police.The accused killer Philippe Steele-Morin, 30, was apprehended earlier this week in the Ottawa area and he is charged with second-degree murder in the Jan. 17 killing of Boisvert, 36.Police said she was likely killed her in Montreal apartment, but her body was found several days later north of Ottawa in Quebec.The arrests of Boucher and Steele-Morin ended a manhunt that lasted over a month.Boisvert had lived in Gatineau, Que. for several years prior to living in Montreal.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Innu communities helping solve mystery of Huntingtons disease

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s a terrible disease and it continues to claim victims, especially among Innu in northern Quebec.Huntington’s disease largely remains a mystery.But thanks to the efforts of research foundations and organizations, the illness is slowly revealing its secrets.Small Innu communities are contributing to the discoveries.APTN’s Danielle Rochette has the story.last_img

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Intervention triggered after Attawapiskat youth overheard discussing suicide says official

first_imgThe Canadian Press ATTAWAPISKAT, Ont.—An official with a First Nation organization in northern Ontario says a nine-year-old child and 12 other youths were overheard making a suicide pact Monday on a remote First Nation mired in a suicide crisis.Anna Betty Achneepineskum of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation says police brought the youths to the local hospital in Attawapiskat for an evaluation, but the hospital was too overwhelmed to see all of them at once and about half of them waited in jail for treatment.Achneepineskum says the entire community in the James Bay region is so overwhelmed by the rash of suicide attempts that three of the four health-care workers have been sent to Thunder Bay for counselling and rest.The Attawapiskat chief and eight councillors declared a state of emergency Saturday evening, citing the community’s 11 suicide attempts so far in the month of April and 28 recorded attempts in March.Achneepineskum says some of the young people have been released back to their parents, while others are being treated for a variety of mental health issues.She says a group from Nishnawbe Aski Nation, a political organization that represents 49 First Nations communities including Attawapiskat, made plans a month ago to come into the community to talk about the suicide crisis.last_img read more

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Commissioners named for National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and

first_imgBy Dennis WardWINNIPEG – A National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls will get underway next month.After a series of unexplained delays, the federal government announced details about the inquiry this morning, including the five commissioners who will head up the process.The commissioners are:· The Honourable Marion Buller, Chief Commissioner· Michèle Audette, Commissioner· Qajaq Robinson, Commissioner· Marilyn Poitras, Commissioner· Brian Eyolfson, CommissionerThe national inquiry will have a budget of 53.86-million dollars and run for a little more than two years, from September 2016 to December 31st, 2018.And for the first time, a national inquiry will be able to make recommendations across all juristictions.Buller, who will act as chief commissioner, was the first female First Nations member of the B.C. judiciary.Michele Audette is the former president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada.Qajaq Robinson is an interesting choice for some. She practises general civil litigation with particular emphasis on Aboriginal law, She was born in Nunavut but is reportedly not Inuk.Marilyn Poitras is a University of Saskatchewan professor. According to her biography, her expertise and passion is around Constitutional and Aboriginal Law.Brian Eyolfson is an Ontario human rights lawyer.In response to the pre-inquiry recommendations, the government also announced today $16.17 million over four years for the creation of Family Information Liaison Units in each province and territory and to increase victims services funding to provide culturally-appropriate victims services for families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and survivors of violence.More coming….last_img read more

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Discrimination against two spirit Indigenous people linked to suicide crisis

first_imgThe Canadian PressOjibwa- Cree elder Ma-Nee Chacaby says coming out nearly 30 years ago was like unzipping her skin so she could reveal her true self.It was a moment of relief after years of pain.“I’ve been happy since that day,” she said in an interview from Thunder Bay, Ont. “I admitted to myself who I was and what I was about.”Prior to 1988, Chacaby said she was bullied and injured for identifying as two-spirit _ a term she uses to describe carrying both a female and male in her body at the same time.“It really hurt me to be beaten by my own people because I was First Nations and two-spirit and then it really hurt me to have white people beat me up because I was brown and I was two-spirit,” she said.Discrimination persists today toward Indigenous people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, transgender, queer and two-spirit, said Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett _ an issue experts say is connected to the youth suicide crisis.“There’s a big hesitancy just around the Indigenous suicides in Canada for the leadership to recognize that some of those suicides are related to oppression around gender identity or sexual orientation,” said Albert McLeod, the co-ordinator of Two-Spirited People of Manitoba.“It is a taboo conversation.”In an interview with The Canadian Press, Bennett said she heard concerns raised by young people attending the Feathers of Hope _ an event supported by Ontario’s child and youth advocate that includes delegates from northern communities.“When you hear it directly from the young people, I think it really does just break your heart,” she said.“It was almost also the same response of kids who were describing suicidal ideation _that they weren’t allowed to talk about that out loud because they would go to hell.”Experts say there is a clear link to suicide among Indigenous youth.Sen. Murray Sinclair, who spent six years documenting Canada’s church-operated, government-funded residential school system, agrees there is an undoubted connection.“They are not going to go to hell, but they might be treated like they are in hell,” he said in an interview. “That’s a real fear.”Evangelical foundations often speak out strongly against traditional values and beliefs, particularly around two-spirited people, Sinclair said.“That is a direct result of the Christian foundations of the residential schools,” he said.Bennett said the federal government heard stories about the need to flee bullying in communities as part of discussions held ahead of the national public inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women, adding individuals said they had also been targeted in urban centres.One of five commissioners for the inquiry _ human rights lawyer Brian Eyolfson _identifies as two-spirit.“I hope that it might make some people feel more comfortable to tell their stories to the inquiry if they know there is a two-spirited commissioner,” he said. “I come to this work with that life experience, but I am an impartial and neutral commissioner.”Eyolfson said it is critical to hear about different experiences to shed light on what contributes to violence against Indigenous women and girls, including transgender and two-spirit people.Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde, who plans to march in Toronto’s gay pride parade in June, said respect needs to be restored for two-spirit people, traditionally viewed as sacred by Indigenous peoples.“If there is discrimination, if there is intolerance, if there’s racism toward our two-spirited people, that has to end,” he said.There are signs of hope, Bellegarde added, pointing to a two-spirit pride festival held last June by Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation in Saskatchewan.Kevin Seesequasis, a 34-year-old, openly gay councillor, approached his band colleagues who were enthusiastic about holding the event _ an experience that was touching for him personally.“It was really a fantastic demonstration of support but more than that, it really was understanding … that people in our community do face barriers who identify as LGBTQ or two-spirit,” he said.“If there’s any way as leaders we can demonstrate that compassion, love and understanding, it starts with us.”It is critical for leaders to recognize the importance of showing respect to two-spirited children, Sinclair said, noting young people need to be given a sense of validity about who they are.The issue is personal for the former Truth and Reconciliation Commission chairman _ he has daughters who identify as two-spirit.“I … tell them they are special,” Sinclair said.Chacaby also delivers a message of acceptance when she speaks with young people.“If people could just stop and listen and encourage them and just love them as they are, maybe things would be … better,” she said.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Search is on for missing Inuk woman in Montreal

first_img(Donna Paré, 32, has been missing since December. Her disappearance was reported last week.)Intervention worker Jessica Quijano says that it’s likely the people who know her were hesitant to go to police.“Donna, well she’s been living on the street for quite a number of years and often people who live on the street have a lot of issues with police, so it’s not encouraging for a lot of people to go to police,” said Quijano.Quijano works for the Iskweu Project, a division of the Montreal Native Women’s Shelter that aims to reduce the number of missing Indigenous women in Quebec.She wants to emphasize that anybody who is hesitant to go to police with information can reach the Iskweu project by phone, email or social media.“We created this project to encourage loved ones and family when someone goes missing to be accompanied to make a police report and then follow up with the police,” explained Quijano.(Intervention worker Jessica Quijano says that it’s likely the people who know her were hesitant to go to police. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)In Paré’s case, Quijano was allowed to file the report to police, whereas usually the procedure is that the last person who saw the missing individual needs to make the report“I’m happy that the police took the report and that they’ve been following through, I’ve been in constant communication with the detective,” said Quijano.However Quijano says this is all the slimmest of silver linings if Paré is not found safe.Paré has brown eyes, black hair, weighs 47 kilograms (103 pounds) and stands 155 centimetres (five foot one).She has been known to frequent the Berri-UQAM area on the eastern edges of Montreal’s downtown.Anyone with information on Paré can reach Quijano confidentially at 438-868-2448 or can anonymously contact Montreal police directly at 514-393-1133.tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennario Tom FennarioAPTN NewsPolice in Montreal are on the look-out for an Inuk woman who has been missing for nearly four months.Donna Paré, 32, hasn’t been seen since December.Her disappearance was only reported to police last week.last_img read more

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Advocacy group says workers hear about negative police attitudes every day

first_imgKathleen Martens and Brittany HobsonAPTN NewsMore women agreed Friday a young sexual assault complainant was not only treated like a criminal but her constitutional rights were violated in an RCMP interrogation video.“My heart goes out to this person,” said Elba Bendo, director of law reform for West Coast Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF).“People who are doing anti-violence work hear about this every single day.”Bendo was responding to the way a Mountie in Kelowna, B.C., questioned a 17-year-old, Indigenous girl after she reported a sexual assault.The teen was part of the child welfare system at the time.Part of the video – filmed in 2012 – was obtained by APTN Investigates and broadcast this week to widespread condemnation.A former Mountie, victims’ advocates and federal politicians all denounced the officer’s tone and questions, including asking whether she was “at all turned on?”Rona Ambrose, the former interim leader of the federal Conservative party, said the exchange reminded her of the ‘knees-together’ judge, Robin Camp.“He made her feel like it was her fault,” Ambrose said of the Mountie. “This is unacceptable.“It took courage for her to come forward.”(Former Conservative cabinet minister and interim leader Rona Ambrose)Ambrose recently proposed a private member’s bill mandating judges receive mandatory sexual assault awareness training after Camp, a provincial court judge in Calgary, asked a sexual assault complainant in 2014 why she couldn’t keep her knees together.He acquitted the male suspect after finding his story more credible, questioned the complainant’s morals and said her attempts to fight off an attack were weak.Ambrose said myths and stigma around sexual violence need to be dissolved so victims can stop being “discouraged, dismissed and disrespected.”APTN News made another portion of the 2 ½ hour video public Friday.Here is that segment:Girl: “Well, it depends if he had like a knife or something, I’d probably just listen to what he had to say.”RCMP: Okay, that’s fair. This (NAME REMOVED) fellow didn’t have a knife.Girl: “But, we were in his house, he had anything he wanted.”RCMP: “And you also knew how to get up and run out of the house, right?Girl: “Yeah.”RCMP: “I mean, he’s taking your clothes off. How much of a fight did you put up for him not to take your clothes off?”Girl: “But, I don’t remember him taking my clothes off.”RCMP: “But, you told me- like I’m reading in your statement here where it says he took your pants and shirt off and your phone fell out of your pocket when your shirt came off.”Girl: “I remember that, but I don’t- like it’s hard to explain. Like I didn’t think. There’s a fight or flight response.”Read More:‘Were you turned on by this at all?’: RCMP officer asks Indigenous youth during sexual assault report‘It’s bias. It’s absolute bias’: Former RCMP trainer says interrogation video is ’embarrassing’ ‘Shocked and horrified’: Politicians respond to RCMP interrogation video Bendo feels the power dynamic between the older male officer and younger female complainant further traumatizes the girl.“It brings me back to so many of the stories that we heard when we did our report on dismantling the barriers to reporting sexual assault,” Bendo said.(Glori Meldrum, the founder and chair of Little Warriors.)Bendo said laws that appear progressive on paper are ineffective when police stick to old-school thinking.“They’re so deeply offensive but every one of the questions this police officer asked is outside of the legal test of consent,” she said.“…Our laws have for some time now said refusing consent does not include fighting back  – that you don’t need evidence of fighting back to prove that there was a lack of consent.”Meanwhile, the founder and chair of Little Warriors, a national child abuse survivor charity, said the RCMP needs help.Glori Meldrum offered – free of charge – to share her group’s online, trauma-informed, interviewing course with every police force in Canada.“I’m hopeful that they’ll reach out and we can have a conversation and that they know it’s not an attack it’s an offer,” she said from Edmonton.“That we just want to make sure when people are interrogated they’re treated the right way.”kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more

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Googlebred Waymo aims to shift robotic cars into next gear

first_imgATWATER, Calif. – Google’s self-driving car spin-off is accelerating efforts to convince the public that its technology is almost ready to safely transport people without any human assistance at all.Waymo, hatched from a Google project started eight years ago, showed off its progress Monday during a rare peek at a closely guarded testing facility located 120 miles (193 kilometres) southeast of San Francisco. That’s where its robots complete their equivalent of driver’s education.The tour included giving more than three dozen reporters rides in Chrysler Pacifica minivans travelling through faux neighbourhoods and expressways that Waymo has built on a former Air Force base located in the Californian Central Valley city of Atwater.The minivans smoothly cruised the roads — driver’s seat empty and passengers in the back — at speeds of up to 35 mph (56 kph). By contrast, the Waymo-powered minivans that have been driving volunteer riders in the Phoenix area still use safety drivers to take over control if something goes wrong.But Waymo’s real goal is to get to the point where people in cars are nothing but passengers.Waymo CEO John Krafcik told reporters that the company will be making some cars and freight trucks totally driverless fairly soon, though he didn’t provide a specific timetable. “We are really close,” he said. “We are going to do it when we feel like we are ready.”Since Google began working on self-driving cars in 2009, dozens of established automakers such as General Motors and Ford Motors have entered the race, along with other big technology companies, including Apple and ride-hailing service Uber. The competition is so fierce and the stakes so high that Waymo is currently suing Uber , alleging that one of its former managers stole its trade secrets and took them with him when he joined Uber in 2016 as part of an elaborate scheme. The trial in that high-profile case is scheduled to begin in early December.Waymo is hoping to infuse its technology into ride-hailing services such as its current partner, Lyft, and big-rig trucking companies. It also intends to license its automated system to automakers such as Fiat Chrysler Automobile, which is already using it in 100 Pacifica minivans.last_img read more

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US hedge fund reports owning more than a 5 stake in Obsidian

first_imgCALGARY – Activist investor FrontFour Capital says it will attempt to influence decisions at Calgary-based Obsidian Energy Ltd. (TSX:OBE) after accumulating more than 27 million shares.The Greenwich, Conn.-based hedge fund says in a declaration filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it has a 5.5 per cent stake in the oil and gas company formerly known as Penn West Petroleum. The filing is required if any entity owns more than five per cent of a publicly traded company.The filing says that the shares were purchased because they are undervalued and therefore represent an attractive investment opportunity.FrontFour says it has been in touch with company directors to discuss its strategy and board composition and says it intends to continue the communication, without being specific.FrontFour’s principal owner is listed as Zachary George, the son of former Obsidian chairman Rick George, who died in August.Obsidian shares gained six per cent or 10 cents Tuesday to close at $1.70.last_img read more

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Ontario delays release of report on elevators pending plan of action

first_imgTORONTO – The Ontario government is delaying the release of a consultancy report on elevators commissioned by the province’s safety authority last spring and delivered in November while it puts together a response.While the Liberal government initially said it was up to the safety organization to release the analysis of elevator reliability and availability to the public, it now says that won’t happen for several more weeks.“We are currently reviewing the report and considering next steps to improve elevator availability in Ontario,” Barbara Hanson, with the Ministry of Government Consumer Services, said this week. “We look forward to making the report publicly available in the coming weeks, along with an action plan to address its recommendations.”In April last year, the government ordered the arm’s-length Technical Standards and Safety Authority to commission a study amid concern about growing issues with out-of-service elevators in a society increasingly dependent on them. A private member’s bill from Liberal backbencher Han Dong that among other things would mandate time limits for getting defective lifts operational received widespread political support but drew the wrath of the dominant industry players.In response, the authority contracted with Deloitte to do the study — led by retired justice Douglas Cunningham — with an October deadline. As Cunningham prepared to finalize the report, the country’s four main elevator companies, alarmed by Dong’s bill and other proposed measures, produced their own report that cast a wide net of blame for “real and perceived” problems with the industry.The companies, multinational giants Kone, Otis, Schindler and ThyssenKrupp, which essentially exonerated themselves, also blasted the safety authority for what they characterized as stifling red tape.Cunningham went back and revised the report to reflect those concerns but the safety authority known as the TSSA had a final version in early November. At the time, it said it was awaiting government permission to release it publicly.“We have asked the TSSA to translate the report into French and convert it to an accessible format before making it public,” Hanson said in early December.This week, however, the TSSA confirmed the holdup was at the direction of the government, which faces a general election in six months.In an interview Tuesday, Dong said he, too, had yet to see the final report or its recommendations, but said he trusted the government was preparing a far-reaching “industry-norm changing” plan to deal with elevator maintenance and availability.“It’s not to manage this issue, it’s to actually fix it,” Dong said. “A lot of caucus members are behind me on this issue.”Dong said his bill was “very much on the front-burner” and he was adamant something would be done before voters pass judgment on Premier Kathleen Wynne’s government in June.Steve Robinson, a spokesman for the safety authority, said he was unable to provide any details on the report or the holdup of its release.“It is indeed a TSSA report — we commissioned it and paid for it,” Robinson said. “But we were asked to provide the report to the ministry for their consideration before making it public.”A previous investigation by The Canadian Press found widespread problems with elevators across the country, including growing calls to emergency services by people trapped in them and others essentially stranded on upper floors by out-of-service lifts, sometimes for months on end.last_img read more

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NS projects increased budget surplus of 345 million for 201819

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s projected surplus is up $5.1 million to $34.5-million for 2018-19, mainly due to energy giant Shell walking away from six offshore exploration licences.In a budget forecast update released Thursday, Finance Minister Karen Casey said her department is projecting a $93.3-million increase in total revenue over the budget tabled in March — a figure that includes $60.4 million from Shell’s licence forfeiture, and a $30-million increase in personal income tax revenue due to “higher projected personal taxable income.”The department said Shell was to spend $996 million in total, and the forfeiture figure represents a 25 per cent penalty on the $241 million that was left unspent by the company.About $25.7 million of the forfeiture money is to be spent on a long-service award payout to 1,400 long-term care nurses, while Casey said the remainder — upwards of $36 million — will be spent at a later date as the government sees fit.“There are many projects that government considers,” said Casey. “Some of those do become projects that can be announced, and until they are it would be folly for us to announce them.”Casey admitted it’s not the best way for the government to rake in revenue.“I wouldn’t say it’s a happy windfall. I would say that it’s a forfeiture that’s come back to the government and we are going to be wise and prudent in how we use it.”Casey’s reluctance to tip her hand on the use of the money drew fire from opposition critics.“I think with all the questions that we’ve had in the house on the transparency of this government, and to actually say we have $36 million and we aren’t going to tell you what we are going to do with it is absolutely irresponsible,” said Progressive Conservative finance critic Chris d’Entremont.NDP Leader Gary Burrill also questioned the government for being tight-lipped about its plans, saying there are plenty of areas that could use extra financial support.“Particularly we see this in the world of health care, primary care, emergency care, long-term care,” Burrill said. “The investments are desperately needed and the government needs to focus less on the accumulation of a surplus and more on making the investments that are required.”Casey said departmental spending is expected to increase by $113.2 million, mainly due to $70.8 million more than originally budgeted for health care services including such things as increased ambulance call volumes and increased costs for special pharmaceutical drugs.The government said additional appropriations totalling $115.9 million would be needed.Total expenses are forecast at $10.95 billion — $88.4 million higher than the budget estimates.Meanwhile, the projected excise tax on recreational cannabis has been revised down by $5.9 million from the budget because of the changing of the federal legalization date. In March the government had issued a rough projection of about $20.8 million in fresh taxes and duties from projected sales of about 12 million grams of cannabis.Casey said complicating matters in forecasting cannabis revenues is the fact that implementation costs still aren’t fully known yet.The minister was asked whether that’s created concerns for future revenue projections.“It’s one of those things that is very uncertain,” said Casey. “Those (projections) are all estimates, there are no concrete numbers yet.”last_img read more

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Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Wednesday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (15,095.02, up 218.02 points).Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Up 13 cents, or 6.1 per cent, to $2.26 on 28 million shares.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Up 22 cents, or 2.74 per cent, to $8.25 on 11 million shares.Baytex Energy Corp. (TSX:BTE). Energy. Up 11 cents, or 4.66 per cent, to $2.47 on 7.5 million shares.Crescent Point Energy Corp. (TSX:CPG). Energy. Up four cents, or 0.88 per cent, to $4.60 on 6.5 million shares.Manulife Financial Corp. (TSX:MFC). Financials. Up 12 cents, or 0.56 per cent, to $21.42 on 6.4 million shares.Suncor Energy Inc. (TSX:SU). Energy. Up $1.52, or 3.54 per cent, to $44.50 on 5.6 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Metro Inc. (TSX:MRU). Up $1.31 or 3.1 per cent to $44.13. The grocery chain’s sales grew more than 15 per cent in its first full quarter since acquiring the Jean Coutu Group pharmacy chain. The acquisition helped boost Metro’s sales by 15.7 per cent to $3.74 billion for its fourth quarter, a 12-week period ending Sept. 29, compared to the same quarter the previous year, which lasted 13 weeks. Sales rose 2.5 per cent excluding Jean Coutu and the extra week. Food same-store sales, a key retail metric, increased 2.1 per cent, while pharmacy same-store sales advanced 1.8 per cent.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Up $2.12, or five per cent to $44.64. Alberta’s cannabis Crown corporation has stopped issuing any new pot retail licences after only receiving 20 per cent of the stock it ordered amid a Canada-wide supply shortage. The Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission had ordered enough cannabis product to stock up to 250 recreational pot shops for the first six months of legalization. The commission has also contacted all cannabis growers with federal licences to sell cannabis but has had “no success” due to the shortage.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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