Expert examines Catholic marriage

first_imgSacramental marriage is a relatively new concept for Catholics, Nancy Dallavalle said in a lecture at Saint Mary’s on Wednesday. Dallavalle, associate professor of Religious Studies at Fairfield University in Conn., addressed how marriage is viewed in today’s society and by Catholics in her talk “Are you in? Catholicism and Public Life Today.” “Marriage is clearly in the New Testament, but the notion that sacramental marriage has always been viewed as a sacrament is not the truth,” she said. “Marriage generally came from families and local customs — the church did not own marriage.” As civil structures broke down, the Catholic church stepped in to claim marriage as it’s own, Dallavalle said. “Marriage became one of the primary ways the Church could act authoritative in the public square,” she said. Dallavalle also said that social patterns are changing and have been changing for a while now. “There has been an increase of about 31 percent of women cohabitating with someone before they are married to that person,” she said. “Living together before marriage is no longer correlated with failure, but it is seen as a stepping stone to success in marriage.” Dallavalle also showed the audience a Subaru commercial, which depicts an American couple on their honeymoon — pitching a tent in the woods and having time to themselves after being married. “What does this video say about marriage?” Dallavalle said. “The Subaru commercial is self-expressive and is about the two people on their honeymoon. This is more of the American way of viewing marriage and sexuality — more self-expressive and separated from the public square.”last_img read more

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Donnelly eyes Senate seat in upcoming election

first_imgEditor’s Note: This story is the first in a series featuring the race for the Indiana seat in the United States Senate. U.S. Rep. Joe Donnelly sees his potential new role as U.S. Senator as an opportunity to help bring the American dream to a greater number of Hoosiers. “[This campaign] is about people, it’s about the challenges families face and trying to make everyone’s American dream come true – to help be a small part of that,” Donnelly said. On Nov. 6, Donnelly will face off with Republican Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock to become Indiana’s next member of the U.S. Senate and the first Notre Dame graduate to ever sit in the upper house of Congress. Donnelly said Indiana voters’ choice on Election Day will come down to a few fundamental issues. “The choice in this election here in Indiana is crystal clear: it’s a question of who will fight for you and who will fight for middle class families,” he said. “My opponent, Richard Mourdock, has said that Medicare is unconstitutional, that Social Security is unconstitutional and that he doesn’t believe in bipartisanship.” Donnelly said if Mourdock were to win the race, it would be a departure from a tradition of moderate leaders representing Indiana. “He’s an extreme Tea Party candidate, and I’ve been – from the first day I started in Congress, an independent moderate,” he said. “Indiana has a long tradition of moderate, common sense U.S. senators like Richard Lugar and Evan Bayh, and that’s the tradition that I have served in the House and I intend to serve in the United States Senate.” Having worked in the private sector and other public roles in Indiana before his 2006 election to the House of Representatives representing the district including South Bend, Donnelly said a continued focus on his Indiana roots best prepares him to represent the state in Washington. “I think the most important thing is working back home in Indiana for 27 years in just a regular job, helping to run a printing business, practicing law and everyday raising my family back home,” he said. Donnelly said the campaign for Senate has differed from his experience campaigning for and serving in the House of Representatives because of the broader constituency he’s gotten in touch with. “It’s a chance to meet even more people from our state and see the incredible amount of diversity we have – in people, in geography – but at the end of the day, we’re so similar in that we want a job, to see our family have a wonderful life, and to see our country grow stronger,” he said. “In that way, all Hoosiers are the same.” As the media continues to maintain a major role in elections, Donnelly said the coverage has been more of an asset than a challenge. “I just look at it as a chance to talk to people from our state,” he said. “When I’m talking to [the media], I’m talking to the people of our state. So I look at them as a positive, a chance to continue the conversation, and a chance to hear what people think.” A 1987 graduate of the University, and a 1991 graduate of the Notre Dame Law School, Donnelly said the University has played a crucial role in his personal development. “Notre Dame has helped shape who I am as a person. I’ve known so many wonderful priests at Notre Dame, have been able to go to school with so many extraordinary people and have been taught by so many wonderful professors,” he said. “It’s helped shape who I am. I met my wife at Notre Dame. My children went to Notre Dame.” Donnelly said he has been thankful for the level of political engagement by Notre Dame students and alumni. “In the past I’ve had interns working in our congressional office almost every semester, a number of Notre Dame grads serve on my staff – both on the campaign staff and on the congressional staff. What we’ve seen is the talent level and ability of graduates from the University is off the charts,” he said. “I feel very lucky … we have a lot of Fighting Irish doing a lot of extraordinary work.” Donnelly said Notre Dame students with political ambition should pursue those aspirations, but said those who don’t see themselves as leadership material should keep an ear open for the call to lead. “I just practiced law here, worked at a small business, and hadn’t ever thought of running for congress. One day, I was blessed to have friends who talked to me about it, and it developed,” he said. “Don’t feel any pressure to have to do it one day or the next day … being a part of Notre Dame, you have the confidence, the ability and the talent to make anything come true.” Donnelly’s last bit of leadership advice comes from University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh. “I’ve always tried to keep Fr. Hesburgh in my heart. He always said whenever you have a decision to make, do the right thing,” Donnelly said. “That’s the Notre Dame way, and that’s what I try to do.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts World Cinema Festival

first_imgSaint Mary’s Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) is screening four international films on campus this week as part of the annual World Cinema Festival. Mana Derakhshani, director of CWIL, said in an email that the festival is part of the effort to internationalize campus and aims to bring students and faculty an opportunity to acquire a more global perspective through the cinema of other countries.“Saint Mary’s World Cinema Festival continues to support the ongoing internationalization of the curriculum and the College community,” she said. “In addition, the festival brings to light the rich cinematic body of work that is being produced outside of the United States.”Julie Storme, associate director of CWIL, said in an email that internationalization of the campus and curriculum is one of the College’s strategic goals.“Internationalization requires that all members of our community have a greater awareness of the world beyond Saint Mary’s and beyond the United States,” she said. “A world film festival contributes to this awareness, particularly because films offer us a glimpse into other cultures — their values, perspectives and they way that people live in them.”Derakhshani said the festival is showing films from France, Iran, Argentina and Japan that are both popular and award-winning films from France, Iran, Argentina and Japan.Storme said Saint Mary’s students were able to suggest films to be included in the festival.“We’re showing a variety of films. Selection was based on a number of factors — their recognition, the picture they give of the way individuals live in the particular country, vignettes of life that those of us in this country might not expect to exist in the countries of origin of the films we’re showingYesterday evening the festival began with a showing of “The Intouchables.”“About Elly,” “The Secret in Their Eyes” and “Linda, Linda, Linda” will be shown Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights, respectively.  All films will be shown at 7 p.m. in the Vander Vennet Theatre in the Student Center.Tags: CWIL, SMC, World Cinema Festivallast_img read more

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Out with the Old.

first_imgBut Smith said Georgia peanut growers can handle the pressure. “This shows that the government is willing to support U.S. agriculture,” said Nathan Smith, a CAES peanut economist.Major Change A new farm bill is complete and nears approval for the 2002 crop season. Georgia farmers hope this new deal can correct past mistakes and hand them a better way to deal with a sluggish U.S. farm economy trying to ease its way into a global market. This new six-year farm bill is priced at $170 billion, more than double the government’s spending for the 1996 farm bill. Engineered into the 2002 farm bill are mechanisms to compensate farmers during times of low prices and let things alone when prices improve. The new farm bill also increases spending to compensate farmers for improved farm conservation and environmental practices. Peanut growers face major changes in the new farm bill. Georgia produces the lion’s share of the total U.S. peanut crop. It did just that, Shurley said. But prices plummeted, with no adequate safety net to catch the farmers. The government had to pay out record ad hoc payments to keep many farmers in business. In the past, the U.S. government regulated, through a quota system, how peanuts were sold. Under the new farm bill, peanuts will be treated much like other U.S. commodities. They’ll be subjected to world competition. Current quota holders will be compensated for the loss of the old pricing system. The old farm bill sought to comply with world trade rules and take the government out of the business of controlling the supply of major U.S. commodities, such as cotton, wheat, corn and soybeans. “The peanut grower that will survive under this farm bill will be the one with a low cost of production … who can find a niche market for certain peanut traits (manufacturers want),” Smith said.By the Rules? “The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002,” long debated by House and Senate conferees, has now been published. It must be passed by both chambers and then signed by President Bush before becoming law.”From what we can see, this new bill will provide for a much better income safety net for farmers,” said Don Shurley, a cotton economist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Out with the Old The new farm bill replaces the controversial “Freedom to Farm Act of 1996,” which sought to wean farmers off government subsidies and into world competition. U.S. manufacturers, he said, would be willing to pay the small difference for U.S.-grown peanuts. U.S. Rep. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) was the only member of the Georgia delegation to serve on the farm bill conference committee. But already, other countries are questioning whether or not the new farm bill complies with the World Trade Organization. They threaten to protest the new bill. “It’s going to be a better deal than you’ve had,” Chambliss told about 70 cotton and peanut farmers in Doerun, Ga., April 26. “You guys are going to be happy with the numbers on peanuts and cotton (and other major U.S. crops).” “The new farm bill will put our peanuts within about 5 cents per pound of the world price,” he said.last_img read more

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Vanguard, Biggest U.S. Mutual Fund, Will Monitor Climate Risk Across Its Holdings

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Vanguard Group on Monday said it has urged companies to disclose how climate change could affect their business and asset valuations, reflecting how the environment has become a priority for the investment industry.Under pressure from investors, Vanguard and other fund companies have pushed to pass several high-profile shareholder resolutions on climate risk at big energy firms like Exxon Mobil Corp and Occidental Petroleum Corp during the spring proxy season.Vanguard manages about $4 trillion and is often the top shareholder in big U.S. corporations through its massive index funds – giving it a major voice in setting corporate agendas.Vanguard, the biggest U.S. mutual fund firm by assets, had not supported climate activists on similar measures. But Glenn Booraem, Vanguard’s investment stewardship officer, said in a telephone interview on Monday the issue as well as shareholder proposals have evolved.“Our support for these proposals is not a matter of ideology, it’s a matter of economics,” he said. “To the extent there are significant risks to a company’s long-term value proposition, we want to make sure there is long-term disclosure of those risks to the market.”Vanguard earlier this year changed its proxy voting policies to give more leeway to support resolutions tied to climate risk, but until now it has given few details about its thinking unlike rivals State Street Corp or BlackRock Inc.More: Vanguard seeks corporate disclosure on risks from climate change Vanguard, Biggest U.S. Mutual Fund, Will Monitor Climate Risk Across Its Holdingslast_img read more

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Weekend Pick: Charleston Marathon

first_imgThe 4th Annual Charleston Marathon, both half and full, is this weekend January 18th.  The course winds along the waterfront, historic King Street, and the Battery. Along with the 26.2 and 13.1 mile options, there will also be a Shrimp and Grits 5K for those interested in hitting a little less pavement. You can register either online, at the Health and Fitness Expo from 11am-8pm on January 17th, or on race day starting at 6:30am.The full and half marathon starts at 8am on Saturday near Burke Middle and High School. The entry fee for the full is $100 and $80 for the half. Race coordinators have included a list of water stations and aid stations here. There will be local music and performance groups dotting the course to help keep everyone moving!The Shrimp and Grits 5K also starts at 8am on Saturday, however participants need to meet near North Charleston High School. The course loops through scenic Park Circle. The entry fee is $30.Following the three races, there will be an after party from 9am-3pm for all participants, volunteers, and spectators. Join in on the fun, food, and live music.This race is a volunteer driven, non-profit community event benefitting the Youth Endowment for the Arts. Proceeds help fund grant requests from Charleston area schools for arts programming. If you’re interested in volunteering, take a look at the opportunities listed.  Race coordinators need as many people as possible to make this event a successful one!last_img read more

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Eighteen Members of Los Zetas Arrested

first_imgBy Dialogo December 12, 2011 Mexican military personnel arrested 18 members of a cell of the Los Zetas cartel who had 1,100 hits of cocaine and other drugs in their possession in northern Mexico, the government announced. “Those arrested said that they belonged to the Los Zetas criminal group,” dedicated to the distribution of drugs in the municipality of Juárez, Nuevo León, the 7th Military Zone announced in a statement. At the time of the arrests, 500 hits of marijuana, weapons, cars, communications equipment, and cash were confiscated, in addition to cocaine. Los Zetas are responsible, among other crimes, for burning down a Monterrey casino on August 26, 2011, because the owner of the locale refused to pay extortion money.last_img read more

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George Floyd death sparks Asian American soul-searching

first_imgAs anti-racism protests broke out across the United States, Viet Hoai Tran knew exactly what he wanted to write on his poster — “Yellow Peril Supports Black Power.””If we are talking about fighting for justice, for liberation, for change… all of us have to be part of this,” said the 27-year-old, who was born in Vietnam, but grew up in the US. The death of George Floyd, a black man, in Minneapolis police custody sparked nationwide protests — and a sense of reckoning in the Asian American community, which has historically fraught, even violent, ties with African Americans. ‘Wedge community’ Quach noted the internalization of the model minority myth — the stereotype that Asians are the “best” minority, thus implying that other minority groups are somehow lesser — and colorism, or prejudice against darker skin tones, within the Asian community, among other examples.Even using slogans like “Yellow Peril Supports Black Power” or “Asian Americans for Black Lives Matter,” Quach said, “ignores and minimizes the harm that the AAPI community has inflicted on the black community within the last 50 years,” even if unintentionally.For instance, the “yellow peril” slogan was first used in 1969 by Japanese-American activist Richard Aoki at a protest in support of Black Panther Party co-founder Huey Newton.Aoki was revealed in 2012 to have been an FBI informant on the Black Panthers.Asian Americans have been used “as a wedge community between black community demands and our system,” said Bo Thao-Urabe, a co-founder of the Minnesota-based Coalition of Asian American Leaders (CAAL).It’s important to ensure “our communities are not used against each other,” she added.Groups like CAAL and OCA National, which were already working with black and Latino communities, have made specific pushes to support the current protests.CAAL has provided support for Asian Americans in Minnesota who joined the demonstrations, and OCA has launched several programs explicitly about Asian-black relations, including a workshop on the model minority myth and a virtual summit on Afro-Asian solidarity.Asians 4 Black Lives has supported protests in the San Francisco Bay Area while Equality Labs, a South Asian rights group, has forums and other resources promoting South Asian-black solidarity. Deconstruct the fear Many younger Asian Americans have taken the conversation online, sharing articles on social media about combating anti-blackness. Others have posted lists of key phrases and talking points, translated into languages such as Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese, for “talking to Asian parents about institutional and internalized racism.””Anti-blackness is not just something that you can name and it disappears,” said Jenny Tam, a 21-year-old student at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities who is of Chinese-Vietnamese heritage. “It’s a fear, and fear needs to be deconstructed.”After Floyd’s death, Tam created a Facebook group called “Asian America for Black Power” to connect Asian Minnesotans who wanted to go to protests together.The group quickly morphed into a platform, now with nearly 3,000 members, for sharing resources on where to donate, what to read, where to protest and how to talk with their families about racism.Tam also noted that the coronavirus pandemic had served as a kind of wake-up call for Asian Americans, as it sparked an outpouring of anti-Asian racism, with many blaming China for the virus.Racism “may oppress us differently, but there’s a common enemy. We’re fighting the same thing,” said Tam, whose parents came to Minnesota after the Vietnam War.”We are not white, and so we cannot protect a system that supports white and is harming our black community.” In particular, the revelation that one of the officers charged over Floyd’s death, Tou Thao, is Hmong has caused many Asian Americans to grapple with their community’s complicity.”Yellow peril” is a racial slur articulating the centuries-old Western fear of an East Asian takeover that has been repurposed by Asian Americans in a show of solidarity with the black community. “There’s a lot of anti-blackness in the AAPI community,’ said Tran, referring to the Asian Americans and the US diaspora of Pacific Islanders.One of the worst examples was during the 1992 protests in Los Angeles over the police killing of Rodney King, a black man. Massive rioting broke out during the demonstrations, most of which occurred in the Koreatown neighborhood.center_img Topics : Ethnic Korean store owners, feeling abandoned by the Los Angeles police, shot at black protesters from the rooftops to protect their businesses.”We, Asian Americans, have remained complicit in perpetuating anti-blackness and benefitting from white supremacy,” Kevin Quach, who works on policy at the Asian American advocacy group OCA National, told AFP.last_img read more

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Paul Merson rates Frank Lampard’s transfer signings and Chelsea’s Premier League title chances

first_imgAdvertisement Paul Merson has rated Chelsea’s Premier League title chances (Picture: Sky Sports)Paul Merson believes Chelsea can challenge for the Premier League title this season after spending ‘brilliantly’ during the summer transfer window.Frank Lampard’s side beat Wolves on the final day of the 2019-20 season to finish fourth and qualify for the Champions League.The Blues still finished some 33 points behind champions Liverpool, however, and have enjoyed a productive transfer window as they look to make up ground on Jurgen Klopp’s side.German duo Timo Werner and Kai Havertz, Morocco international Hakim Ziyech, England defender Ben Chilwell and Brazilian veteran Thiago Silva have all arrived through the doors at Stamford Bridge, while Lampard is close to signing a new goalkeeper.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTAssessing Chelsea’s transfer window so far and their chances of winning the Premier League, Merson told Sky Sports: ‘Chelsea have bought brilliantly.‘Ben Chilwell is a great signing. Yes, Marcos Alonso delivered goals, but Chelsea were weak down the left last season and needed a full-back to defend.‘Thiago Silva looks a shrewd piece of business, he a proper centre-half. If Chelsea can get a good year out of him, they have a chance. Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 9 Sep 2020 10:29 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3.7kShares Paul Merson rates Frank Lampard’s transfer signings and Chelsea’s Premier League title chances Comment The pressure is on Frank Lampard after a busy transfer window (Picture: Getty)‘People highlight the fact that he’s 35-years-old, but football is about now, not four or five years down the line.‘Managers haven’t got four or five years, there is no point in them going out and buying a player for the future.‘If they do that, they will be watching that player from the TV after getting the sack!’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe former Arsenal and England star added: ‘Frank Lampard had a free swing last season, no one would have taken the Chelsea job after losing Eden Hazard and being under a transfer ban, but he did unbelievably well getting into the Champions League.‘With the quality of players purchased, it’s clear Roman Abramovich isn’t playing for fourth spot, Chelsea are there to really have a go this season for the title and they have a chance.’Chelsea begin their 2020-21 Premier League campaign on Monday night with a trip to Brighton.Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Kai Havertz requests Chelsea star’s shirt number after move from GermanyMORE: N’Golo Kante wants Chelsea stay amid interest from Inter and Antonio Conte Advertisementlast_img read more

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Scandal rocks Finnish local government pension fund Keva

first_imgEarlier this week, local media also came out with claims that Ailus received child benefits from Finland and Norway simultaneously for eight years, which Norwegian officials are now claiming back.Ailus maintains she was unaware she continued to be paid the benefit after she moved away from Norway.Earlier this week, Keva’s deputy chief executive Tapani Hellsten reacted to the news by announcing he would give up his fringe benefits – a luxury car and a flat – in exchange for an increase in salary.Ailus said she would give up the car and the flats, but pointed out that, to low-earning pensioners, the fringe benefits of pension fund management might seem excessive.Keva will convene and comment on the issue on 22 November.Chairwoman Räty – who initially backed Ailus but recently changed tack – told IPE: “It is of the utmost importance that the management of a local pensions institution have sound judgement.“On the basis of the conversations I have had with Ailus in recent days, as well as the newest developments in this matter, I can no longer say that Ailus’s judgement is up to our standards.” Despite Räty’s announcement, Ailus organised a press conference for Keva staff on Thursday morning, declaring that she had no intention of resigning.Keva’s board will convene on Friday to discuss the issue, although several members of the board have announced that they agree with Räty.The Ministry of Finance, the supervisory body for Keva, is also evaluating the situation and will make its recommendations in mid-December.Keva has also set up an inquiry on its benefit culture.Many in the Finnish pensions industry and media, however, have questioned the objectivity of an inquiry managed by the fund’s own finance Tom Kala, who is one of Ailus’s subordinates.Keva insures 1.3m Finns working or having retired from local government jobs.Ailus was appointed as managing director of the €35bn scheme in 2009 out of a group of 20 applicants.Her appointment has been described as political, as she is a member of the Centre Party and arguably had less experience with the pensions industry than several other applicants.IPE asked Ailus to comment on the situation, but received no reply. Merja Ailus, managing director at Keva, the €35bn local government pensions institution of Finland, may lose her job after local media revealed evidence of tax evasion, prompting the fund’s chairwoman, Laura Räty, to say she had lost trust in Ailus.Last week, Finnish media reported that Ailus’s “fringe benefits” included two luxury flats in central Helsinki and a brand new BMW.Further, the reports alleged that she failed to pay the appropriate taxes for the flats, and that “rules had been bent” in the acquisition of the BMW.When starting at Keva in 2009, Ailus reportedly requested to live in a €2.3m flat and last year requested an increase of €6,100 on her monthly salary of €18,900.last_img read more

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