Hyper X Cloud Stinger a wireless headset for less than £100 unveiled

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. ——————————————————————————————————–Grab these great Prime Day savingsSave £40 on the Kindle Paperwhite£160 off the Dell Inspiron 14 Chromebook Hyper X has revealed their latest headset, the HyperX Cloud Stinger, their first wireless headset available for under £100. It’s quite an attractive proposition: The Cloud Stinger Wireless weighs 270 grams, it’s got 90-degree rotating earcups so it’ll fit snug on your noggin, and the company has pulled 17 hours of battery life out of it, testing the headset at half-volume.“We are excited to expand our award-winning headset line with the addition of HyperX Cloud Stinger Wireless, the best value for a wireless headset under £100,” said Julien Millet, Business Manager, HyperX EMEA. “We are always looking for new ways to deliver an amazing user experience and expanding our Stinger line-up with a wireless headset brings more options to our fans.”HyperX has a well deserved reputation in the headphone space, so the idea that they’re producing an affordable wireless headset with a decent battery life is good news. Take a look at our review of the Hyper X Cloud 2, or the Hyper X Cloud Alpha, both described as one of the best headsets you can get below £100.But of course, we always advise you to wait for the official Trusted Reviews verdict before you get too excited.The headset will work with the PlayStation 4 and PC, and it uses 2.4GHz wireless. It’ll work at a range of up to 12 feet, and it’s a closed back headset, so sound leakage should be minimal.It also features one of my favourite headset features, a swivel-to-mute noise-cancelling mic. This is good if, like me, you like to snack relentlessly as you play and don’t want to subject anyone else to the noise of you eating. It’s also more convienient than trying to hunt out the mute button at a moment’s notice, too.You’ll be able to get it in most places now, for £79.99. It comes with a two-year warranty. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.center_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

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Best Phone Deals for Amazon Prime Day UK 2019 Day 2s live

first_img ——————————————————————————————————–Grab these great Prime Day savingsSave £40 on the Kindle Paperwhite£160 off the Dell Inspiron 14 Chromebook What are the best mid-range smartphones?If the premium phones are bit too expensive, but budget phones don’t cut the mustard, then you’ll be suited well by picking out one of the best mid-range smartphones we’ve listed for you. Top of the pile is the Xiaomi Mi 9, which is good enough to rival flagships with its screen and cameras, and yet retains a temptingly affordable price. The OnePlus 7 also makes our list thanks to its powerful performance — if you’re a keen mobile gamer, this would be an excellent choice from the mid-range. For its fantastic camera performance, the Google Pixel 3a also makes our list.(Back to top) What is the best cheap smartphone?If your budget doesn’t stretch to any of the aforementioned flagship phones, don’t worry. The entry-level smartphone market is just as vibrant, as our best budget smartphones round-up will attest.We’d particularly direct your attention to the Xiaomi Redmi Note 7, which offers strong performance, decent battery life and a great screen for a low price. The Moto G7 Plus is another strong budget contender, thanks to its classy design, clean Android software, and strong camera performance.(Back to top) We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. iPhone XR DealApple iPhone XR (64GB) – BlackSave yourself over £112 this Prime Day on one of Apples most latest and greatest smartphones – the iPhone XR.Amazon|Save £110|Now £639View DealNow £639|Save £110|Amazon Get a whopping 25% off the iPhone X (64GB)iPhone X (64GB) Space Grey – Extra £10 off voucher now liveOur biggest criticism of the iPhone X used to be its price, which was £999. At £599.25, that’s no longer an issue.Amazon|Save £110|Now £789.00View DealNow £789.00|Save £110|Amazon Amazing Samsung Galaxy Note 9 (128GB) dealSamsung Galaxy Note 9 (Single SIM) 128 GB 6.4-Inch Android 8.1 Oreo UK Version SIM-Free Smartphone – Midnight BlackWanting to buy a new smartphone outright? Then get around this Amazon Prime Day Deal and save yourself a whopping £150.99 on the Samsung Galaxy Note 9.Amazon|Save £370|Now £529.00View DealNow £529.00|Save £370|Amazon Best John Lewis Smartphone DealsHuawei Mate 20 128GB – BlackA great mid-ranger utilising Huawei’s advanced camera features and a slick dew-drop notch design, the Mate 20 is a perfect shout for anyone who wants high-end specs for a reasonable price.John Lewis|Save £50|Now £449.95View DealNow £449.95|Save £50|John LewisNokia 5.1 Plus 32GB – BlackTaking the brilliant foundations of its predecessor, the Nokia 5.1 Plus adds a bigger screen and a larger battery to boot, making this one tough budget smartphone to contend with.John Lewis|Save £70|Now £129.99View DealNow £129.99|Save £70|John Lewis What is Amazon Prime day?Amazon Prime Day is a deals bonanza on Amazon comparable to Black Friday or Cyber Monday in the online sales stakes. This year it’s held on July 15 & July 16, and we know to expect a whole raft of savings from products across Amazon’s vast catalogue of products. If you’re looking for a new SIM-Free mobile phone, then there’s a good chance that a few tempting prospects will pop up. We’ll flag the very best deals for you right on this page, so make sure to keep checking back.(Back to top)Want more Prime Day offers?Amazon Prime Day 2019Best Prime Day TV DealsBest Prime Day Laptop DealsBest Prime Day Echo DealsBest Prime Day Philips Hue and Smart Home DealsBest Prime Day Headphones DealsBest Prime Day Fire TV Stick DealsBest Prime Day Kindle & Fire Tablet DealsBest Prime Day Sonos & Soundbar DealsBest Prime Day Wearable DealsBest Prime Day Dyson & Vacuum Cleaner DealsBest Prime Day Camera DealsBest Prime Day Nintendo Switch DealsBest Prime Day Xbox One DealsBest Prime Day PS4 DealsBest Prime Day US DealsFor more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. The smartphone field is stronger than it’s ever been, with a whole bunch of classy handsets available to all budgets. And a good number of those phones are on offer this Amazon Prime Day.We’re into the second and final day of the Prime Day sales bonanza, and there are still loads of bargains to be had. We’ll be bringing you the best of these right up until the last hour, so make sure you bookmark this page and check back regularly.This year has seen big savings on a surprisingly varied range of smartphones, from the imperious Moto G7 right up to the ever-classy iPhone XS. Read on for more details.Jump ahead to:What are the best smartphones? | What are the best cheap smartphones? | What are the best mid-range smartphones? | What smartphone deals can you expect? | What is Amazon Prime Day?Best Amazon Phone DealsHere are the very best smartphone deals we’ve found on Amazon so far: Best Amazon Smartphone DealsMotorola moto g7 4GB RAM and 64GB Storage (Dual Sim) – BlackFor well below the price of most mid-range smartphones, the Moto G7 is one of the few budget devices to come with a dual-camera setup, getting you great shots for less.Amazon|Save £59.01|Now £219.99View DealNow £219.99|Save £59.01|AmazonPocophone F1 by Xiaomi – 6GB RAM and 128GB Storage (Dual Sim)Receiving a stellar 9/10 rating here on Trusted Reviews, the Pocophone F1 is one of the best affordable smartphones money can buy – now going for even less in this fantastic deal.Amazon|Save £50|Now £320.00View DealNow £320.00|Save £50|AmazonApple iPhone X (64 GB) – Space GreyApple’s previous flagship phone is now going for just a fraction of its original price, making this the perfect opportunity to bag yourself a high-end iPhone on the cheap.Amazon|Save £150|Now £799.00View DealNow £799.00|Save £150|Amazon Phone deals at other retailersIf nothing on Amazon suits your budget, it could still be worth checking out other retailers. Best Argos Smartphone DealsGoogle Pixel 2 XL 64GBGoogle’s previous flagship smartphone is now going for its lowest price yet on Argos, getting you one of the industry’s best smartphone cameras for less.Argos|Lowest Price Yet|Now £349.95View DealNow £349.95|Lowest Price Yet|ArgosSony Xperia L1 16GBIf you’re after a smartphone that packs a great battery life, a bright screen and a price tag that won’t break the bank, the Sony Xperia L1 is a steal at this newly reduced price.Argos|Save £30|Now £99.95View DealNow £99.95|Save £30|ArgosSamsung Galaxy S8 64GBSamsung’s game-changing smartphone, the Galaxy S8, is now at one of its lowest prices yet on Argos, making this a great time to bag yourself a previous flagship on the cheap.Argos|Lowest Price Yet|Now £399.95View DealNow £399.95|Lowest Price Yet|Argos This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. What smartphone deals can you expect?Based on recent launch patterns, there are a couple of smartphones which are prime candidates for a sharp knockdown in price. This includes the Google Pixel 3, following the launch of its cheaper Pixel 3a little brother, and the OnePlus 6T, which we expect to tumble in price now that the OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro have hit the shelves.At this point, Prime Day is particularly well-known for its deals on cheaper phones (read our guide the best budget phones). In recent months, we’ve seen several price drops on the Trusted Reviews favourite, Xiaomi Mi 9, with some discounts being as high as £100. Don’t be surprised if another phone from the Xiaomi family sees a price drop during the sale.(Back to top) Get 15% off the iPhone XS for Prime DayiPhone XS (64GB, Space Grey) – Save £142.35Shave a juicy £142.35 off Apple’s latest and greatest handset, the iPhone XS. It’s one of the very best mobiles on the market, offering superb performance and cameras, and an outstanding display.Amazon|15% off|Now £849View DealNow £849|15% off|Amazon Amazon Prime Day Deals Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. What is the best phone in 2019?These Prime Day deals are all well and good, but what’s the best smartphone that money can buy? If you want a snappy, we’d be tempted to say the Huawei P30 Pro. It’s got the best camera and stunning battery life, in particular.Of course, Huawei is going through a bit of a tough spot right now from a political perspective, which might scare you off. There are plenty of excellent alternatives, such as the Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus with its class-leading display and curvaceous design. Or the OnePlus 7 Pro with its fluid software, responsive (and notch-free) 90Hz display, and blistering performance.In terms of pure bangs for your bucks, it’s difficult to look beyond the Xiaomi Mi 9, which provides the kind of aggressive price-performance ratio that should make Apple, Huawei and Samsung sweat. Find out more about how we decide the best phones here.(Back to top) Best Currys PC World Smartphone DealsSamsung Galaxy A40 64GB – BlueFor a limited time only, Currys PC World is offering £40 cashback on a range of Samsung products, including the already brilliantly affordable Galaxy A40 smartphone.Currys PC World|Save £40|Now £179.00View DealNow £179.00|Save £40|Currys PC WorldSamsung Galaxy A70 128GB – BlackWith an in-display fingerprint sensor and a whopping 128GB on onboard storage, the Samsung Galaxy A70 is an absolute steal at this temporarily low price.Currys PC World|Save £60|Now £309.00View DealNow £309.00|Save £60|Currys PC World Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

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Ottawa woman swears off gift cards after simple scam drains cash

first_img Twitter Facebook Comment Sponsored By: Featured Stories More Email Reddit Share this storyOttawa woman swears off gift cards after simple scam drains cash Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Ottawa woman swears off gift cards after simple scam drains cash Think about this next time you reach to grab a gift card off the rack Carole Maisonneuve is warning that gift cards can be compromised, allowing fraudsters to drain them of money almost as soon as they’ve been bought.Errol McGihon / Postmedia It was a simple way to say thanks — three $50 Canadian Tire gift cards bought as Christmas gifts for staff at a community centre where Carole Maisonneuve and her friends hold regular meetings.But the feeling of thanks turned into embarrassment when the recipients tried to spend their cards and found they’d been drained of money by scammers.“I thought, ‘Oh, my God, I was the one who’d collected all the money and bought the cards,” Maisonneuve said. “I wondered if they thought I’d been the one who spent them. The sum was not huge, however the issue is a large one.”Maisonneuve bought the cards at an Orléans grocery store on Nov. 22, picking them off a rack and loading them with cash at the checkout. The gift cards were handed out on Dec. 19. They were found to have been drained in mid-January when the recipients tried to use them.Some investigating revealed that two of the cards’ balance had been spent on Nov. 25, and the third was used on Jan. 8.Here’s how the scam works: The fraudster scoops a handful of cards from the display rack — they’re worthless until a customer puts money on them — and takes them out of the store. They then record or photograph the card’s ID number, peeling or scratching off the cover that blocks some or all of the number. The number is re-covered with a new sticker or scratch strip (which can be bought online) and returned to the store.The fraudster then waits for a customer to buy the compromised card, repeatedly checking online to see if and when a card has been loaded with cash.Ottawa police have heard of the scam, but in most cases the retailers reimburse the losses so police reports aren’t filed, said Staff Sgt. James Ritchie of the Fraud Unit.“It’s not something we’ve seen a lot of, but it’s definitely happening,” he said. “It’s particularly common over Christmas because they know nothing is going to get spent before the 25th. They begin checking on the 24th and start unloading them as fast as they can.”Different cards have different security measures. Most are glued to cardboard or protected with stickers or scratch off coverings. Some prepaid credit cards come in foil pouches, but a determined thief can get around those safety measures, sometimes opening and re-sealing the pouches, Ritchie said.“The stores could eliminate this easily if they just kept them behind the counter, but of course they want them out where people can touch them, you know, get them in people’s faces,” he said.“If I was buying a gift card, I’d choose one from the very back. If someone’s tampering with them, they’d put them at the very front so they’ll get picked. Even better, choose a gift card that is stored behind the counter.”Be alert when buying gift cards. Look for tampering or smudging or for a card that doesn’t quite match the others and then avoid it, he said. And be sure to keep the receipt, so you can prove the card was bought legitimately.Theft of money off a gift card isn’t covered by the Canadian Consumer Protection Act, but anyone who has been ripped off should report it to police or the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501Maisonneuve said she was disappointed to hear how common the scam is. She thinks stores could do more to prevent the fraud.“They (the store) intimated to me that on a weekly basis, they have many of these cards returned. I said, ‘Are you kidding me? Are you satisfied with this?’”The scam joins a long list of crimes involving gift cards, among them telephone fraudsters who convince their victims that some debt — back taxes, a grandchild’s bail bond, the administration fee for a lottery win — must be paid with a gift card. Dishonest online vendors sometimes ask for payment in gift cards, which police point out, is just like mailing an envelope of cash to someone.As for Maisonneuve, she and her friends will think twice next Christmas.“It’s not that we like to give cash, but I’ll tell you, from now on we won’t be buying gift cards.”bcrawford@postmedia.comTwitter.com/getBACALSO IN THE NEWS:With YouTube tutorials and Instagram albums, Ottawa dads tackle questions about masculinity, fatherhood LRT Stage 2, red light cameras: 5 things from Mayor Watson’s 2019 state of the city address GoFundMe launched in support of bus crash survivor after double amputation ← Previous Next → Join the conversation → advertisement Blair Crawford January 30, 201910:40 PM EST Filed under News What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation 1 Commentslast_img read more

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BYD New Energy Vehicle Sales Exceeded 240000 In 2018

first_img Geely Creates New Division For New Energy EVs In December last year, BYD’s NEV sales soared 55.1% month on month (MoM) to 46,650 units. In the meantime, its full-year NEV sales aggressively surged 118% from the year-ago period to 247,811 units, which is far beyond the original 200,000-unit sales goal. To be specific, the annual sales of new energy PVs totaled 227,152 units, of which 103,263 units were all-electric vehicles and 123,889 units were plug-in hybrid vehicles. In addition, 20,659 new energy CVs were sold throughout 2018.According to the sales data released by China Passenger Car Association (CPCA), the BYD Yuan EV and the BYD e5 have long included the top 5 all-electric models by monthly sales. Besides, the BYD Tang and Qin are also regulars entering the top 3 list of plug-in PV models in terms of monthly sales—no wonder the automaker gained such big progress in NEV sales.BYD’s fuel-burning vehicle sales aggregated 272,876 units in the past 2018. The MPV sales were 141,068 units, accounting for 51.7% of total sales of vehicles with combustion engine. The sales of sedans and SUVs reached 59,161 units and 72,647 units respectively.Besides, BYD said the full-year installed energy capacity of NEV power batteries and energy storage batteries totaled around 13.373GWh.Source: Gasgoo More Info On Tesla Model 3 Configuration In China General Motors Has Grand Electric Car Plans For China Up, up and away.China-based automaker BYD Company Limited (BYD) sold a total of 520,687 vehicles in 2018, achieving a year-on-year jump of 25%. Of that, its sales in December were 69,637 units, jumping 36.6% over a month ago, according to an official sales report released on January 7.More China News Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Cadillac Shows Off First Fully Electric Crossover On New EV Platform

first_imgMore details will announced as the automaker moves closer to launch.Last week we learned that Cadillac was going to become the lead brand for launching the next generation of electric vehicles at General Motors. The luxury Detroit automaker would be soon announcing a lineup aimed at going head to head with industry leader Tesla. What we did not know was how long it would take for us to get our first details about the upcoming Cadillac EV.Well the first announcement has come more quickly than we expected. Late Sunday afternoon, Cadillac dropped the images of their first fully electric vehicle.More About Cadillac EVs Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 14, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News A New Cadillac Electric Halo Car Could Potentially Be In The Works Cadillac To Launch Electric Car To Compete With Teslacenter_img U.S. EV Obituary: Cadillac CT6 Plug-In, We Hardly Knew Ye The vehicle shown is not a “compact crossover” as GM calls the Chevy Bolt EV. Instead, the upcoming Cadillac EV will be a 3 row SUV. While details are still scarce, Cadillac says the new electric vehicle platform will be incredibly flexible with a “relatively short design and development lead time”. But the announcement does not simply hint at the future of GM’s electric vehicle platform. It is also a step towards re-invigorating Cadillac.Mary Barry commented on the upcoming fully electric SUV as the beginning of a new era for Cadillac.One of the things that’s going to make Cadillac, Cadillac again is being leading in innovation and technology. We’re very intent on continuing aggressively to accomplish that … This is just the tip of the iceberg.We had been hearing for some time about a future crossover based on the Chevy Bolt that would be launching as a Buick. Previously, GM CEO Mary Barra had announced that multiple vehicles would be launching on the Chevy Bolt platform. So far that has not come to pass. After the announcement that Cadillac would become the tent pole brand for the new EV platform, it is no surprise that the Cadillac EV is the first to be officially announced.For the past several years, Buick and Cadillac have been the primary focus of the automaker’s efforts in China. But the most important aspect for Americans is that this was announced on the U.S. media site at a North American event. This likely indicates this vehicle is not merely a play for the Chinese market.This article will be continually updated as we receive further details. DETROIT — Cadillac furthered its recent product blitz today with the reveal of the brand’s first EV. This will be the first model derived from GM’s future EV platform. GM announced on Friday that Cadillac will be at the vanguard of the company’s move toward an all-electric future.“Cadillac’s EV will hit the heart of the crossover market and meet the needs of customers around the world,” said Steve Carlisle, president of Cadillac. “It will represent the height of luxury and innovation while positioning Cadillac as the pinnacle of mobility.”The Cadillac EV’s name and additional details will be revealed closer to launch. Today’s announcement is part of Cadillac’s aggressive product acceleration announced this week — in addition to revealing the all-new XT6 crossover, the company also hinted at both a future Escalade and an upcoming performance sedan. Overall, Cadillac will introduce new models at the rate of roughly one every six months through 2021.GM’s future EV platform, which Cadillac will be the first to use, will be flexible, allowing the company to respond quickly to customer preferences with a relatively short design and development lead time. The Cadillac portfolio will eventually benefit from a variety of body styles that can be spun off this architecture.The most advanced components within this platform are the drive units and battery cells, both of which are being designed for maximum usability throughout GM vehicle lineups in different countries. The EVs can be configured in front-, rear- or all-wheel drive, and the output of their battery systems will be adjustable based on vehicle and customer needs.last_img read more

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Short passes are the key to escaping Liverpools cage

first_img sarkmah Football tactics Share on Twitter 23 Apr 2008 17:04 talkingblues Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook unthreaded Short passes are the key to escaping Liverpool’s cage Shares00 Share on Facebook Share Twitter Share on Twitter As a United fan, I lurrrrrrve the way that some Chelsea fans and the manager seem to be talking about REACHing the final. Nobody mentions winning it. FFS, don’t let that huge sliced header of highly undeserved luck go begging. Liverpool aren’t the best at chasing the game, most of their recent excellent CL results have been from going into the second leg with an advantage (except that one last year against…) It’s not their game to chase it, especially away.So, enjoy your cup final next Wednesday and here’s hoping that it is United rather than Barcelona that only have to turn up to beat a satiated Cheslea in Moscow. Share via Email Share on Facebook tommitourbus Report Chelsea | Pick Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook oldest Share on Facebook | Pick Report Luis Garcia anyone ? Facebook Essien is back next week and our MF with Lampard back on song will set the tone and win the battle easily at the Bridge. Lucky the goal was, but it’s sweet justice for “that” goal. To Russia with love……And come on you Mancs, let’s have an all England final (which your part is to lose, of course 🙂 Share on Twitter Reply Share What is the story with Drogba? I know he’s supposedly not match fit – & has struggled all season with injuries(doesn’t stop him scoring every time he plays Arsenal though…) But he looks totally disinterested – & some of his attempts to win free kicks etc last night were laughable.Rumour is he’s on his way at the end of this campaign – & if his performance & attitude last night is anything go by, Blues fans will be glad to see the back of him. As Henry’s time at Arsenal passed, so has Drogba’s at Chelsea. 0 1 Reply | Pick Facebook Share Share Twitter 0 1 Share on Twitter Facebook 0 1 You mean like the short passes Arsenal approached them with? Twitter Share on Twitter 0 1 | Pick Share on Facebook lorddangeresq Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 comment | Pick Twitter Twitter Reply 0 1 Share on LinkedIn Facebook Report Share on Twitter Reply | Pick Report 0 1 Divided opinions above then, as far as I can see. It’s only 10.00am and I guess the indignant Liverpool fans aren’t up yet (11.00am opening?).It was a tight game, but I reckon Lordthingumybob got it right, he’s obviously not a Chelsea supporter because of his comments on Drogba (I think an educated Arsenal fan, eh?). The return will probably be just as tight, which is a shame, both teams can play pretty well when they want to. Rafa said it from the start, 2 holding midfielders and 4 defenders and we’ll look for Chelsea mistakes. Nobody has a comment for the ref though, he probably did more good for the game than anyone. He let the diving go, he put it on the players “I’m having none of your crap, sort yourselves out!” He let free kicks be taken quickly while defenders were moaning at him, he let divers dive (shame on you Kuyt, too), and just had a great game. OK, in the end he was almost forced to book Terry (but if you look at the slow motion replay you’ll see Mascherano was actually diving before any contact was made), but he laid out his stall early and stuck by it, well done. Let’s hope there’s more like him at the European Champs, he’ll make the divers look like chumps and we may get half a tournament.Didn’t you love the ‘row 37’ tactics produced by Liverpool 20 mins from time. Football how it should be played!Good on Skrtel though, he played a blinder, another Agger in the making.Nice day all,Beer Report Twitter RAFASBENEATHUS Share on Twitter Oh Brazil you funny person you…that would be due to having only ever reached the semis. but i’m sure you already figured this out. Luck is luck & a huge Norwegian slice of it we may have gotten sure, however the job…is…not…done…yet. If there’s one thing i’ve learnt since the grant, erm, renaissance is that chelsea ain’t as formidable as they once were. factor in those pesky scousers & you’ll forgive us for not thinking winning the thing is a foregone conclusion. baby steps dear BB, baby steps… Not at all Gaffer…unceremonious exits from 2 cups already shoots down any hint of (over)confidence i have in getting past the ‘pool. besides, the reds have shown enough in the comp this season away from home that entitles them to some respect, which i’m sure chelsea will give. any more than that though is to rafa’s advantage. 23 Apr 2008 13:00 0 1 0 1 Share on Twitter Report Share on Twitter Report GafferInOz 23 Apr 2008 12:03 Twitter Twitter Threads collapsed Order by oldest Reply Read more Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 23 Apr 2008 12:34 Share on Twitter 0 1 Share on Twitter Facebook Reply Report I think Drogba needs lots of breathers. Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other 23 Apr 2008 15:58 Facebook Twitter | Pick Share via Email Report Reply Facebook It does make for an interesting 2nd leg alright, as said before, Liverpool in the past are usually ahead going into an away 2nd leg ahead and can sit back, contain, and then hit on the break. However, I wouldn’t write them off, they know how to win these tight European games. And if Chelski continue to hoof it to Drogba all night then they won’t go through. I think it’ll go to 1-1 on the night at some stage, and then it’s well and truly up for grabs – extra-time and who knows, maybe penalties.I see that both United and Chelski fans think they’re in the final now and United fans think they’ve already won it. Overconfidence can do wonders for the opposition. 23 Apr 2008 16:37 3 Share on Facebook Reply | Pick Facebook Champions League Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share 0 1 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Reply Share Comments 73 Reuse this content,View all comments > Share Share on Twitter 0 1 Share on Facebook Report Chelsea didnt deserve a draw last night, but then Liverpool didnt deserve their last 2 semi wins so it evens it up a bit.As for Didier Drogba’s performance, frankly it was reidiculous. I would like to see UEFA hitting this pr*ck with an unsportmanship conduct charge. Its a shame the BAFTAs have gone, because with his pained expression, everytime he was touched, he would definitely be up for the best actor gong. 0 1 Canuckistanian Reply Share Share on Facebook Reply Facebook The Fiver: the Guardian’s take on the world of football | Pick Report Report 23 Apr 2008 13:51 Facebook Share on Twitter Reply 0 1 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Share Twitter Reply ICharlie 0 1 Share | Pick Share Twitter Share on Facebook 23 Apr 2008 14:28 | Pick Report Report Report Reply that’s a mighty big ‘if’ there, tommi! it’s like saying, if only all my numbers came up i’d win 30m quid in powerball. must be a recent graduate of the andy grey school of bleedin obvious commentary. ;)oh & there’s a small matter of united to contend with on sat before even looking at liverpool again. Buroo Share on Messenger liberalexpat Twitter Twitter When Chelsea got to grips and reacted in the last third of the match they played a shorter passing game, trying to manipulate the ball around Liverpool’s trap. It suited them much better. Once beyond Mascherano and Alonso they got close enough to support Drogba and looked the more cohesive unit. Chelsea will know they are more effective when they work the ball through the field and get Lampard and Ballack closer to the front. They have enough quality to command the ball, whatever close attention they receive, and play their way out of tight situations.Avram Grant will look at the recording and persuade his middle men to pass among themselves more. Playing the longer, direct ball to Drogba is a tactic better used intermittently. The second game will open out and Chelsea’s midfield players may hold the key. Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter Reportcenter_img sandycheeks 23 Apr 2008 9:53 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Reply 23 Apr 2008 15:00 23 Apr 2008 16:02 0 1 Share Twitter | Pick Share Share on Twitter DavidMuch simpler: If makelele and malouda didnt start this game, chelsea would have won. Could I have a fee? Report 25 0 1 Share on Twitter 0 1 Just had to turn on Radio Five Liverbird at the final whistle. Anybody else hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth from the assmbly of Scouse loving commentators they have on that station? Priceless! Lawrenson sounded like he was about to go postal, the guy hosting the show (Saggers?)had the loudest sneer I’ve ever seen on radio, Green was furious!!! He was like a bear with a sore head on his phone in and cut off anybody who said anything in favour of The Blues. The only Chels fans allowed on were the saddos who blether on about it used to be better when we were losing (do you ever meet these people? I don’t). It was all cracking stuff.The game. The fact is, we were away. At Anfield. So-called most intimidating arena in football. You don’t go there and waltz about playing platinum football, you have to graft, and have a good keeper, and stay in the game.If the roles had been reversed and the game was at Stamford Bridge, this morning we’d be hearing how Liverpool deserved the draw because they kept on going and never let Chelsea get too far ahead. Share on Facebook Report 50 1 comments (73)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. | Pick Reply Share Topics Share Close report comment form Share Share on Facebook Share Report Share 23 Apr 2008 16:58 “I don’t get why Drogba is getting all of this bad press.”Because he goes down easier than a ten dollar whore? Reply Share on Pinterest Chelsea too often hit long balls to Didier Drogba but working the ball around more got them out of jail 0 1 Share BrazilBranch 23 Apr 2008 13:25 At last we get a bit of luck! Makes a change. David is correct we need to do something about the ineffective Drogba and stop making simple mistakes such as lead to their goal. I felt a draw was fair but we need to address the way they controlled the midfield. All in all and absorbing game and certainly not at all boring! Chelsea for the final at last,it’s our year this time. 3 23 Apr 2008 11:54 0 1 Crouch unleashed at the Bridge 2-1 Liverpool. Riise atoning for mistake and crap haircut Share on Twitter Report 23 Apr 2008 16:08 100 Report Reply Share on Facebook Reply Las7 Share on Twitter 23 Apr 2008 16:08 23 Apr 2008 17:03 tommitourbus “At last we get a bit of luck! Makes a change”Yes, football fans the world over have a great deal of sympathy & feel for you after the incredible bad luck of being bought by a crass Russian billionaire, willing to pump endless funds into the club & buy a sucsession of world stars who would otherwise never have gone to such an unremarkable club. After that you deserve a change of fortune. Share Share on Twitter 23 Apr 2008 16:47 Share on Twitter Twitter First published on Tue 22 Apr 2008 21.29 EDT Twitter Liverpool 1 recommendations Share on Twitter Reply All Share on Facebook I don’t get why Drogba is getting all of this bad press. I saw him set up J.Cole in the first half and Lampard; Ballack and Malouda(best chance for us in the second half) in the second. He was basicly all alone and stranded up front for most of the game and did what he could. A month ago in a similar situation Zlatan couldnt even create a single chance. The midfield was none existant; Lampard set up a few chances but those were difficult balls for both J.Cole and Drogba. Mostly his long balls were ineffectual. Ballack had 40% passes go into opposition players – which is unacceptable for a central midfielder. While Malouda and J.Cole rarelly made themselves available-although with Ferreira and A.Cole soldemly crossing the half way line that wasnt suprising. Maka is simply abit too old for a full game at this speed. Honestly I would prefer Essien; Mikel/SWP and Ballack/Lampard the second leg. Also Kalou should never be a sub for Malouda-he has shown over the course of the season that he is in better form and should be playing. I feel the arguement is spot on about our lack of short passing game. Ballack and Lampard are too similar and one needs to be dropped in the next game. But Grant doesnt have the balls to drop one of them. When SWP was playing centrally I felt we had more ballance in the midfield. Also it’s unacceptable for our full backs to be so passive-they had Kuyt and Babel against them for most of the game for god’s sake. Also Terry needs to stop fumbling about. We got a huge slice of luck unlike previous games against Liverpool in the CL. Hopefully we show a completly different face in the second leg-because if we play the same way we did last night I wouldnt be suprised if we loose. Facebook | Pick | Pick 2 Reply Share on Facebook Twitter Why don’t you talk abit about Torres then both went down quite alot, yet the focus is only on Drogba. Twitter Twitter Reply Share Facebook expanded Share on Twitter Report David Pleat | Pick 23 Apr 2008 14:20 Facebook Share Sportblog 23 Apr 2008 16:29 Twitter Report 2 I wonder if Chelsea do make the final with the frankly clueles Avram Grant whether Liverpool fans will appreciate that getting to the final isn’t just about ‘tactical genius’, but also a large slice of luck.I think possibly Riise’s finest contribution for Liverpool, the looks on the faces of the team and the fans at the end were absolutely priceless. Show 25 0 1 Football tactics 0 1 23 Apr 2008 16:14 | Pick Reply Reply Share 23 Apr 2008 12:40 Report Facebook I know its not over yet and we still have a lot to do like making Lamps and Drogs perform. I thought Grant should have taken Drogba off sooner, he was a not match fit shadow of his usual self. If we get everyone on song at the Bridge we should do it OK. But I agree that we arn’t formidable any more. Glad that Sheva stayed on the bench! theKnowledge | Pick 0 1 Facebook Reply Why do people who don’t support Chelsea go on about Drogba? Drogba doesn’t go down to get people booked or win free kicks. He just goes down, clutching his back. It doesn’t hurt the opposition, it just puts him out of the game for a while as he lays contemplating the Milky Way. It’s Chelsea fans who should be fed up with him. | Pick Facebook Chelsea started comfortably but expressionless and finished with a slice of fortune which may mean they make Moscow in May. Towards the end the men in blue played with greater conviction, Salomon Kalou more involved than Joe Cole, and the late substitution of Nicolas Anelka for Michael Ballack did not affect Claude Makelele, the defensive shield.José Reina was not tested enough; Petr Cech was busier and his saves were vital in denying Fernando Torres, Steven Gerrard and Dirk Kuyt. Liverpool were a little unfortunate to lose their advantage. They strangled Chelsea’s midfield threesome, Javier Mascherano and Xabi Alonso getting close to Ballack and Frank Lampard and Gerrard closing Makelele quickly whenever Chelsea’s back four had the ball.Consequently Chelsea were captured in Liverpool’s cage, unable to release themselves and gain good possession. With their wide players, Joe Cole and Florent Malouda, peripheral, far too many passes were directed longer up to Didier Drogba. His immense power was matched by Martin Skrtel in a heavyweight contest. The dramatic Drogba, ploughing his lone furrow, was continually frustrated. Share Facebook | Pick flybynyter 23 Apr 2008 16:59 View more comments Facebook Facebook newest talkingblues Share on Twitter | Pick Report Deyna sleepwalker 23 Apr 2008 9:35 | Pick Twitter Shabuku sarkmah 23 Apr 2008 15:22 0 1 tommitourbus Share on Twitter Reason (optional) 0 1 | Pick Share on Facebook Las7 Sportblog Most fans in the UK probably don’t realise that both Rafa and Grant were actually managers of rugby union teams back in their native countries.Their respective teams, Gordito Valenciano and Chatty Haifa, relied almost exclusively on the up-and-under and backs who kicked long for touch.Benitez and Grant have remained true to this tried and trusted formula, though ditching most of the other RU tactics, with some notable exceptions – like Carragher’s loose forward tackling. Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook Facebook | Pick Tue 22 Apr 2008 21.29 EDT sarkmah Report Loading comments… Trouble loading? Facebook crouchagol Share on WhatsApp Twitter | Pick Chavski?You’ll never score alone. Email (optional) beermonster Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment collapsedlast_img read more

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Olympics IOC under fire for removal of protest video

first_img Support The Guardian Topics Olympic Games Digger Share on LinkedIn First published on Thu 14 Aug 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Shares00 Thu 14 Aug 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Messenger Protest International Olympic Committee Share via Emailcenter_img Olympics 2008 Share via Email Share on Twitter Olympics: IOC under fire for removal of protest video Olympics 2008 Since you’re here… Share on Pinterest A Free Tibet video on YouTube was taken down under the International Olympic Committee’s intellectual-property deal with the internet site.The video features a protest last Thursday night in which demonstrators are holding a vigil by candlelight during which they projected on to the wall of the Chinese consular building in New York images of Tibetan monks being arrested. The video then showed the five Olympic rings, which proceed digitally to morph into handcuffs.Several Free Tibet and technology blogs that had monitored the situation claimed that the IOC had “abused” its rights to YouTube’s claim-your-content policy, accusing it of “censorship”.”The video is a crystal clear case of fair use – it’s 100% legal and non-infringing -and the IOC has absolutely no right to force the video out of view,” said an article on the online television website, Getmiro.com.Giselle Davies, the IOC’s director of communications, said the clip’s removal had been due to the intervention of a computer programme set up to tackle copyright infringements. “A YouTube video containing the Olympic marque was taken down by automated copyright-protection software,” she said. “This was the result of the system operating automatically to prevent the illegal uploading of Olympic content.”Davies said the video had been reinstated to YouTube but, needless to say, the video cannot be accessed from the Olympics’ main press centre.Ban the blazers, says CoeSebastian Coe is threatening to impose a ban on Olympic officials at the London 2012 opening athletes’ parade. The Beijing procession turned into a farce when numerous blazers marched in ahead of the athletes. Coe never attended an opening ceremony during any Games at which he was competing, considering the long waits to be detrimental to his performance. While he will take steps to make the long ceremony more “benign” for athletes, Coe wants to build a bonfire of officials’ vanities. “You don’t want to spend 30 seconds looking for the [athletes] and wondering where they are,” said Coe. “It’s not about the administrators of the world being hand in hand.”Tribute to coach and dadThe International Association of Athletics Federations held its council meeting on Tuesday and paid tribute with a minute’s silence to Coe’s late father, Peter, who passed away last Saturday. The gesture recognised his status as a successful, self-taught coach who after reading textbooks of East German techniques inspired his son to become the British athlete who broke more world records than any other.Tom needs a little Jerry As Steve Foley, Britain’s performance director for diving, investigates the causes of the breakdown in the relationship between Tom Daley and Blake Aldridge, he might wish first to focus on giving the 14-year-old his childhood back. Despite the media scrutiny on Daley, it has escaped most people’s notice that Chen Ruolin and Wang Xin, above, the winners of the women’s 10m synchronised diving for China on Tuesday, were 15 and 16 years old respectively. Chen revealed that whenever nerves struck she thought back to a visit to Disneyland in California, spending her spare time watching Tom and Jerry DVDs. Which makes a change from Daley’s endorsement-heavy speeches.Haze over ‘green’ claim Beijing’s billing as the “green” Games stretches credulity to a point off the scale. Having begun with giant pyrotechnic footprints, these Olympics have been expanding their carbon profile with the fleet of buses that sit in the parking lots around the Olympic park. Though fitted with limiters to keep speeds below 40mph, bringing emissions down, the drivers defeat the object by leaving their diesel engines running throughout the day. There are multiple buses on each of the 56 routes from the media centre to hotels and a further 1,700 buses and 3,500 cars laid on for the athletes. Matt Scott in Beijing … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on WhatsApp Digger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Dementia Friends Educate Communities One Friend at a Time

first_imgTweet26Share170Share20Email216 SharesWhat’s a great way to educate the public about dementia and its impact on communities? An online series of brief videos that highlight how people can help individuals with dementia and their care partners navigate their environments is one place to start. An initiative known as Dementia Friends USA is doing just that as part of their mission to create more dementia-friendly communities.The concept originated in the United Kingdom, where 1.7 million people are certified Dementia Friends.Here in the United States, ChangingAging Tour sponsors in Santa Clara County, Calif., are a shining example of a community that is working hard to make its surroundings more dementia friendly by incorporating the Dementia Friends program. The effort is part of the county’s initiative to become designated as dementia friendly through Dementia Friendly America (DFA), as well as age-friendly through AARP and the World Health Organization, by July 2017.In fact, Santa Clara County was one of DFA’s pilot communities in in 2015, according to Diana Miller, project manager for the county’s Seniors’ Agenda program. Their crusade to promote Dementia Friends began about a year ago, when representatives from Japan and the UK introduced the concept to them.“People really resonated with the Dementia Friends initiative presentation, so we decided to adopt it,” says Miller. “Making it easier was the fact that DFA was getting a license to launch in the United States.”The official unveiling of the county’s effort began last month with a standing-room only crowd of 200 people representing 25 organizations. President of the Board of Supervisors for Santa Clara County Dave Cortese proudly showed off his Dementia Friend certificate, says Miller, and the group has since committed to a goal of encouraging 5,000 county residents to do the same.Miller is already putting a dent in the goal by urging all of her coworkers in the Department of Aging and Adult Services to get certified. “I’ve encouraged everyone in our programs to become a Dementia Friend,” she says.Also in attendance at Dementia Friends launch was Heather Lerner, executive director of the Happy Hollow Foundation and founder of the Senior Safari Walkabout at the Happy Hollow Park & Zoo in San Jose. She was so impressed with it she became a Dementia Friend herself and convinced her husband to follow suit.“Dementia Friends is a really simple, awareness-building tool that encourages all of us to take a moment, slow down, be patient, and spend a little time interacting with those that need a little compassion and understanding to remain as independent as possible for as long possible,” Lerner says.Lerner notes that the videos are easy to watch, take very little time, and leave the viewer with the idea that they can help just by being aware citizens. “You get the gist pretty quickly about how and when to offer help,” she adds. “I am a huge fan and advocate of anything that chips away at our long-held and outdated viewpoints around cognitive function.”When I began working on this assignment there were 5,351 Dementia Friends in the United States, according to the organization’s website.I am now the 5,352nd Dementia Friend and I have encouraged my daughter and friends to become certified. It was indeed easy, educational, and brief, taking just 10 minutes to complete. Now it’s your turn! Click here to get certified and report back to us in the comments below.It’s true, almost anyone can find the time to do it, which is a small price to pay for turning understanding into action and making a difference in your community. The ChangingAging Tour’s Disrupt Dementia performance will feature additional tools and resources from Dementia Friendly America. Dave Cortese receives his Dementia Friend certification Senior Safari Walk Senior Safari Walk Senior Safari Walk Senior Safari Walk Senior Safari WalkRelated PostsBuilding a Dementia-Friendly MovementLeading the nation in the creation and proliferation of dementia-friendly communities is quite a responsibility to bear, but the Land of 10,000 Lakes has made it look somewhat easy with the implementation of more than 43 such communities in the span of just four years.Book Review: Aging Together – Dementia, Friendship and Flourishing CommunitiesBooks on dementia are usually addressed not to friends but to family caregivers or professionals. I approached this book with excitement because we rarely see the words “dementia,” “friendship” and “communities” together.Disrupt Dementia With Us: Day 1Imagine a community where people living with dementia mentor others, feel love, compassion and are comfortable coming out of the ‘dementia closet’. Those were some of the themes we explored in day one of our Disrupt Dementia retreat in Seattle.Tweet26Share170Share20Email216 SharesTags: Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia Friends Dementia Inclusivelast_img read more

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Stateoftheart HIV treatment regimen could save lives and prevent new infections in

first_img Source:https://www.massgeneral.org/about/pressrelease.aspx?id=2247 Apr 30 2018An HIV treatment regimen already widely used in North America and Europe would likely increase the life expectancy of people living with HIV in India by nearly three years and reduce the number of new HIV infections by 23 percent with minimal impact on the country’s HIV/AIDS budget. The findings from an international team of investigators have been published online in the Journal of the International AIDS Society.”This study is the first to show that, in India, changing current therapy to a dolutegravir-based regimen would be safer, save lives and prevent new infections – all without increasing the cost of care,” said lead author Amy Zheng of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Medical Practice Evaluation Center in Boston.Dolutegravir, developed by the HIV specialist company ViiV Healthcare, has been shown to have fewer side effects and be less likely to induce drug resistance than other currently available HIV drugs. It is currently recommended in North America and Europe as initial therapy for newly infected patients and is available in multiple African countries. A generic version has only recently become available in India.The researchers used a widely-published mathematical model to project the survival and economic outcomes of adopting a dolutegravir-based regimen as first-line therapy by the Indian health system. Based on cost estimates from the Clinton Health Access Initiative, the analysis assumed the annual cost of the new drug would be $102 U.S. per patient, which is slightly higher than the $98 annual cost of current therapy in India. The team assessed the impact of a dolutegravir-based regimen on life expectancy, the number of new HIV transmissions, HIV care costs and the national Indian HIV budget over 2- and 5-year time horizons.The results indicated that the new regimen would extend the life expectancy of people living with HIV by 2.8 years and prevent 13,000 new HIV infections over 5 years. Importantly, using dolutegravir as first-line treatment is likely to be cost-effective in 2 years and cost-saving over 5 years – that is, the clinical and public health benefits would be realized at no additional cost to the national government, compared with the costs of the current regimens. Adoption of dolutegravir-based treatment would likely reduce the number of patients who require a switch to more costly and less effective second- and third-line HIV therapies.Related StoriesNovel method can help clinicians identify individuals most in need of PrEPAlcohol reduction associated with improved viral suppression in women living with HIVHIV therapy leaves unrepaired holes in the immune system’s wall of defenseStudy author Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, MD, chief medical officer of the Y.R. Gaitonde Centre for AIDS Research and Education in Chennai, India, says, “Given the size and scope of the HIV epidemic in India, making a dolutegravir-based regimen first-line therapy through the National AIDS Control Organization will provide tremendous benefit to our patients and to India as a whole.”In late 2017, two India-based pharmaceutical companies agreed to provide a generic, dolutegravir-based combination drug to several African countries for $75 per patient per year, a cost even lower than that of current HIV therapy in India. However, in spite of these new advances in HIV therapy in other nations, generic dolutegravir remains out of reach in India – both because of its current costs in that country and because it is not yet the standard therapy – a country in which more than 2 million people live with HIV, the world’s third largest population with HIV.”With India being the world’s leading producer of generic HIV therapy, it only makes sense for the tremendous benefits of these therapies to become available to people with HIV in India,” added study senior author Kenneth A. Freedberg, MD, MSc, of the MGH Medical Practice Evaluation Center, a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.last_img read more

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New type of sensor acts like Velcro for prostate cancer cells

first_imgJun 7 2018Researchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro® for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method, reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.In men with prostate cancer, some tumor cells exit the prostate gland and circulate in the blood. Detecting these cells could enable diagnosis at an earlier stage or help doctors assess whether treatment is effective. However, because circulating tumor cells are present in very small numbers, finding them can be a challenge. Previous sensors have been expensive and difficult to make. So Shudong Zhang and Shutao Wang wanted do develop a simpler, more cost-effective way to monitor prostate cancer cells in the blood.Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyThe researchers based their device on frosted glass microscope slides, commonplace in high school science classes. The frosted area, which is used to hold and label the slide, is a sandblasted surface with tiny depressions. The researchers added a solution to the frosted slides that caused silica nanowires to grow on their surfaces, then they dangled antibodies that recognized prostate cancer cells from the nanowires. After getting captured by the antibodies, circulating tumor cells became trapped in the depressions on the slide and tangled up within the nanowires, similar to the interlocking surfaces of Velcro®. The team could then visualize the cancer cells with microscopy, and found that the device had a capture efficiency on par with other approaches, they say. When the researchers tested blood samples from prostate cancer patients, the devices detected as few as 10 tumor cells in 1 milliliter of blood. Source:https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/presspacs/2018/acs-presspac-june-6-2018/inexpensive-detector-is-like-velcro-for-cancer-cells.htmllast_img read more

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Scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteriaderived molecules

first_img Source:https://www.scripps.edu/news/press/2018/20180615-chemistry-antibiotics.html Jun 19 2018Bacteria found in soil may harbor a potential game-changer for drug design. A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.The finding comes from Ben Shen, PhD, and his colleagues on the Florida campus of Scripps Research. The team investigates “natural products” made by organisms such as soil-dwelling bacteria.”We use natural products as an inspiration for chemistry, biology and drug discovery,” says Shen, professor and co-chair of the Department of Chemistry at Scripps Research.Related StoriesNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from withinNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicalsStructure of bacteria responsible for traveler’s diarrhea decipheredThiocarboxylic acids caught Shen’s attention because of their rarity in nature and similarity to lab-made molecules called carboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are good “warheads” because they can home in on biological targets, making them a key ingredient in many antibiotics, heart disease medications, and more.Shen and his colleagues took a closer look at two natural products, platensimycin and platencin, that have been extensively investigated as potential antibiotics. Much to their surprise, platensimycin and platencin, which have been known for over a decade to be carboxylic acids, are actually made by bacteria as thiocarboxylic acids.The researchers revealed, for the first time, the exact genes, and the enzymes they encode, that bacteria use to create thiocarboxylic acids.From there, the scientists set out to test whether nature-made thiocarboxylic acids could also act as biological warheads. The researchers discovered that, as antibiotics, platensimycin and platencin thiocarboxylic acids appeared to bind to their biological targets even better than their carboxylic acid counterparts.”That was exciting to see,” Shen says. “We’ve now identified thiocarboxylic acids as natural products that can be used as drugs, and thiocarboxylic acids as warheads should be applicable to man-made drugs as well.”Interestingly, thiocarboxylic acids appear to have been hiding in plain sight. The molecules were thought to be rare and have not been appreciated to date as a family of natural products. Thanks to the current findings, the researchers now know how these producst are made in nature. Upon searching databases of bacterial genomes, the researchers found that many species of bacteria around the world have the genes to produce thiocarboxylic acids.”There are many, many thiocarboxylic acid natural products waiting to be discovered, making them a treasure trove of potential new drug leads or drugs” says Shen.last_img read more

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Study Skinny fat may be important predictor of cognitive performance in older

first_imgJul 5 2018A new study has found that “skinny fat” – the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass – may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. While sarcopenia, the loss of muscle tissue that is part of the natural aging process, as well as obesity both negatively impact overall health and cognitive function, their coexistence poses an even higher threat, surpassing their individual effects.The study, published in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging, was led by researchers at Florida Atlantic University’s Comprehensive Center for Brain Health in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine.Using data from a series of community-based aging and memory studies of 353 participants, the researchers assessed the relationship of sarcopenic obesity or skinny fat with performance on various cognition tests. The average age of the participants was 69. Data included a clinic visit, valid cognitive testing such as the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and animal naming; functional testing such as grip strength and chair stands; and body composition (muscle mass, body mass index, percent of body fat) measurements.Results from the study show that sarcopenic obesity or “skinny fat” was associated with the lowest performance on global cognition, followed by sarcopenia alone and then obesity alone. Obesity and sarcopenia were associated with lower executive function such as working memory, mental flexibility, self-control and orientation when assessed independently and even more so when they occurred together.Using a cross-sectional design, the researchers found consistent evidence to link sarcopenic obesity to poor global cognitive performance in the study subjects. This effect is best captured by its sarcopenic component with obesity likely having an additive effect. This effect extends to specific cognitive skills, in particular executive function.”Sarcopenia has been linked to global cognitive impairment and dysfunction in specific cognitive skills including memory, speed, and executive functions,” said senior author James E. Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., one of the most prominent neuroscientists in the country, associate dean for clinical research and a professor of integrated medical science in FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine, and a professor in FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing. “Understanding the mechanisms through which this syndrome may affect cognition is important as it may inform efforts to prevent cognitive decline in later life by targeting at-risk groups with an imbalance between lean and fat mass. They may benefit from programs addressing loss of cognitive function by maintaining and improving strength and preventing obesity.”Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaObesity may contribute to the risk of impaired executive function through vascular, behavioral, metabolic, and inflammatory mechanisms or can result from reduced impulse control, self-monitoring, and goal-directed behavior in individuals with impaired executive function with a negative effect on the ability to maintain energy balance. The exact mechanisms linking obesity to cognitive dysfunction are yet to be determined, although several pathways including sedentary behavior, inflammation, and vascular damage have been proposed. Sarcopenia, in turn, has been linked to impairments in abilities that relate to conflict resolution and selective attention. Executive function is reduced in obese older adults, and improvement in muscular function has been linked to enhancement of executive function in senior adults.Galvin and his study collaborators, Magdalena I. Tolea, Ph.D., a research assistant professor of integrated medical science, and Stephanie Chrisphonte, M.D., a research assistant professor of integrated medical science, both in FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine, caution that changes in body composition including a shift toward higher fat mass and decreased lean muscle mass represent a significant public health concern among older adults as they may lead to various negative health outcomes including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.”Sarcopenia either alone or in the presence of obesity, can be used in clinical practice to estimate potential risk of cognitive impairment,” said Tolea. “Testing grip strength by dynamometry can be easily administered within the time constraints of a clinic visit, and body mass index is usually collected as part of annual wellness visits.” Source:http://www.fau.edu/last_img read more

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UTHealthled survey shows much work remains to increase safety of ehealth records

first_imgAug 17 2018Four years after their publication by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), voluntary guidelines designed to increase the safety of e-health records have yet to be implemented fully, according to a survey led by a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Findings appeared recently in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.”Less than 20 percent of the recommendations were fully implemented across all the organizations,” said Dean Sittig, Ph.D., the study’s lead author and a professor at UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics.Related StoriesSmart phone health monitoring devices will revolutionize healthcareGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsHealthcare solutions of the future: Boehringer Ingelheim relies on digitalizationDeveloped by Sittig and Hardeep Singh, M.D., of Baylor College of Medicine, the Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience or SAFER guides entail 140 unique recommendations separated into nine separate guides.To see if health care organizations willingly implemented the recommendations in the guides, Sittig, Singh and their colleagues asked eight health care organizations in the United States and Australia to conduct a self-assessment. The results were presented anonymously.Broadly divided into three domains, the recommendations in the “safe health IT (information technology)” domain had the highest adherence rate followed by the “using health IT safely” domain and the “monitoring health IT” domain.”This is not surprising because the domains were conceived as sequential building blocks,” said Sittig, who is on the faculty of the UTHealth Memorial Hermann Center for Healthcare Quality and Safety. “The safe health IT domain contains many recommendations required for e-health record system certification.”Examples of the recommendations in the “safe health IT” domain include “Data and application configurations are backed up and hardware systems are redundant” and “EHR downtime and reactivation policies and procedures are complete, available and reviewed regularly.”While the researchers did not evaluate why the adherence rates varied among the health care organizations in this survey, they speculated that the differences could be related to budgets, personnel skill mix and organizational priorities.Sittig said the results could be used by other organizations to benchmark their progress toward achieving a safe and reliable e-health record. Source:https://www.uth.edulast_img read more

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New study describes effect of radiation exposure on hormone deficiency in children

first_imgAug 21 2018In a new study, University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, have detailed the effect of radiation exposure on the development of hormone deficiency in pediatric and young adult patients treated for brain tumors.These results, published in the Aug. 17, 2018 online edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, provide evidence that further supports minimizing the dose of radiotherapy to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland and will help predict the risk of hormonal complications for those being treated with radiotherapy for brain tumors.The hypothalamus is a region of the forebrain that coordinates the activity of the pituitary gland, and together, they regulate many of the hormones in the body that control growth, metabolism, adrenal function and gonadal function.”There isn’t much data defining the dose response of radiation therapy to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in pediatric and young adult patients with brain tumors,” says Ralph Vatner, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology and lead author on this study. “We examined the correlation between radiation therapy dosage to these brain structures and development of endocrine dysfunction in this population.”Vatner says dosimetric data–measurement, calculation and assessment of the ionizing radiation dose absorbed by the human body–and clinical information was collected from 222 children and young adults (younger than 26 years old) with brain tumors treated with proton radiotherapy on three prospective studies (2003 to 2016) coordinated by Massachusetts General Hospital.Proton radiotherapy is a form of radiation treatment used for certain types of cancers and lymphomas. A major advantage over traditional forms of radiotherapy is its ability to deliver radiation to a tumor with remarkable precision, sparing healthy tissues. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center/UC Health Proton Therapy Center is the only facility of its kind locally and only one of about 28 in the country.Deficiencies of various hormones, including growth hormone, thyroid hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and gonadotropins, were determined using serum collected from patients along with their clinical symptoms, and radiation dose was calculated using the treatment plans for these patients. Statistical models were developed using these data to estimate the effect of radiation dose and age on the development of hormone deficiency.Related StoriesLong term opioid medications impacts production of important hormonesMetals bind to and influence peptide involved in insulin productionSavings from lower insurance costs of growth hormone drugs not passed on to patients”Radiotherapy for brain tumors is known to cause hormone deficiency in some patients, and children are especially sensitive to this potential side effect. We were able to analyze data from 189 pediatric and young adult patients treated with proton therapy at [Massachusetts General], with an average follow-up of 4.4 years (between 0.1 to 13.3 years)–the largest study of its kind and the first with patients receiving proton therapy for a variety of brain tumors,” Vatner says. “Among these patients, the rate of any hormone deficiency at four years was 48.8 percent, but this was strongly associated with the dose of radiation and the age at time of treatment.””This provides strong support for the benefits of advanced radiation technologies such as proton therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, especially in younger patients,” he continues. “These data will help physicians predict the risk of deficiencies in growth hormone, thyroid hormone, adrenal corticosteroids and sex steroids in their patients receiving radiotherapy for brain tumors on the basis of patient age and radiation dose to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Moving forward, physicians can use these models to help navigate their treatment planning and identify patients who will most benefit from advanced technologies like proton therapy that can treat tumors while better sparing healthy normal tissues.”This project was supported by the federal share of program income earned by Massachusetts General Hospital on a National Institutes of Health Grant C06 (CA059267).Vatner receives honoraria and research funding from Varian Medical Systems, a radiation oncology treatment and software maker. Source:https://www.healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/30192/last_img read more

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ScienceShot Displaced Snakes Slither Back

Taking an invasive Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) out of the Everglades may be a lot easier than keeping it out. That’s because the snakes have an impressive ability to find their way home, report biologists who tracked snakes in Florida’s Everglades National Park. They relocated six Burmese pythons up to 35 kilometers away from the spots where they were captured. In a matter of months, five of the snakes had returned to within a few kilometers of their original locations. By tagging the snakes with GPS devices, the scientists showed that pythons far from home slither about three times faster than those already in their home region and more often travel in long, straight lines. Similar long-distance navigation had been shown only in smaller snakes before. Researchers hope the new observation, published online today in Biology Letters, will help them paint a more complete picture of how the pythons take over new territories and move throughout the Everglades and other areas they’ve invaded.See more ScienceShots. read more

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Frozen Scythian stallions unravel mysteries of horse domestication

first_imgFirst tamed by humans about 6000 years ago, horses today bear distinct marks of their early domestication. Thousands of years of inbreeding, for example, have littered horse genomes with detrimental DNA. And because modern stallions all share a similar Y chromosome, early equestrians must have studded their herds with just a few males. Or so researchers thought. Now, by sequencing the genomes of 11 frozen stallions buried 2300 years ago in a Scythian prince’s tomb in the permafrost of Kazakhstan (above), researchers have discovered that the first horses came from plentiful male stock. What’s more, detrimental DNA had not yet begun to accumulate by the time these Eurasian nomads harnessed horsepower to conquer neighboring peoples. The new work also shows that wild horses continued to interbreed with domestic ones throughout this time period, evolutionary geneticists reported last week at the Biology of Genomes meeting in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. The scientists call their work a “proof of principle” in their push to sequence ancient DNA from 100 horses of other ancient civilizations—such as the Roman Empire—to fill out our horse-human history.last_img read more

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Video Game of Thrones ants sport dragonlike appearance

first_imgIf you’re a Game of Thrones fan, you’ll probably spot something familiar in the names of two new ant species found in New Guinea: Pheidole viserion and P. drogon. The insects may not be as large as the dragons they’re named for, but their spiky spines and unusual colors (the former is yellow, and the latter dark red) wouldn’t be out of place in fantasy fiction. The Pheidole ant genus includes more than a thousand species, all of which contain worker ants with oversized heads and jaws that allow them to break up food. But P. viserion and P. drogon—along with a couple other species—also sport spiky spines. Scientists thought the spines were used for defense, but 3D imaging (as seen in the video above) reveals that the spines contain muscle fibers attached to the ants’ heads, which may have allowed them to evolve such large noggins, researchers report today in PLOS ONE. The findings don’t explain, however, why other species with large heads don’t have the spikes; the team says that future research will further explore this new idea.last_img read more

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Power from peat—more polluting than coal—is on its way out in Ireland

first_img By Emily TonerDec. 12, 2018 , 2:25 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email That is now beginning to happen. By the end of 2019, the Irish government will eliminate all of the roughly €100 million in annual industry subsidies it now pays for peat-generated electricity. Bord na Móna, which supplies peat to the three remaining power stations burning it for electricity, announced in October that it would cut its peat supply for electricity by a third by 2020 and end it completely by 2027. Ireland will need to find alternative, lower carbon sources of electricity. And approximately 60 bogs no longer needed for fuel will be converted back to wetlands or put to commercial uses such as land for wind farms.Behind the phaseout is Ireland’s promise to the European Union to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% in 2020, compared with 2005 levels. “The country’s decarbonization agenda is driving Bord na Móna’s step down from peat,” says Joe Lane, the company’s chief operating officer. Even so, Ireland will miss its goal. Despite rapid growth in wind power and increasingly energy efficient homes and vehicles, it will struggle to reduce emissions by even 1%, says Phillip O’Brien, scientific officer for the Irish Environmental Protection Agency in Dublin.Like any energy transition, this one comes with a human cost. Up to 430 jobs will be lost, Lane says. “Most of the people who will lose their jobs are people who have worked for Bord na Móna for a long time—people whose fathers, grandfathers, and villages are all tied to the company.”And replacing peat with biomass, as the power companies plan to do, is not a panacea. A decade ago, Bord na Móna began to cofuel a peat-burning station with mixtures of biomass including a grass called miscanthus, olive pits, almond shells, palm kernel shells, and beet pulp, much of it imported from all over the world. Because biomass takes up carbon from the atmosphere as it grows, the European Union counts it as a carbon-neutral, renewable resource—even though transportation, processing, and land-use costs make it less so. “The unregulated or unfettered use of biomass would lead to serious problems,” says Robert Matthews, a scientist at Forest Research in Surrey, U.K. In 2021, European legislation will tighten biomass standards, reducing the advantages of burning it from a carbon accounting standpoint.Rehabilitating the harvested peatlands, however, is a clear plus for climate. When bogs are drained to harvest peat, or for any other use, such as agriculture, grazing, or forestry, exposure to oxygen jump-starts the decomposition of the stored organic matter, releasing carbon into the atmosphere. A 2013 study of Irish peatland carbon emissions, published in Irish Geography, found that each hectare of industrially drained and stripped peatland emits 2.1 tons of carbon per year—the equivalent of driving a car 30,000 kilometers. And that’s before the harvested peat is burned.Those emissions cease as soon as drains are blocked and the water table rises to resaturate the peat, cutting off oxygen. As a result, ecologists say, conserving peatlands has a triple benefit: reducing emissions from both power plants and exposed fields and, with restored plant life, sequestering more carbon in future peat deposits. “Peatlands are our rainforest, our carbon sink,” Lowes says.Moreover, healthy peatlands improve water quality and provide needed habitat for threatened species such as curlews and marsh fritillary butterflies. “Our goal is to make things as wet as we can, where we can,” says Catherine Farrell, an ecologist at Bord na Móna. She says that of the 80,000 hectares of peatland under company management, 18,000 hectares have been rehabilitated.But in a country where peat smoke rises from chimneys every day, that’s just a start. People cut peat to burn in their houses from another 600,000 hectares of peatlands, and there are few plans for rehabilitating these degraded bogs. Catherine O’Connell, director of the Irish Peatland Conservation Council in Lullymore, would like to see more action to heal the bogs. “There’s a lot of bare peat around,” she says. “There’s a lot of hemorrhaging carbon.”*Correction, 13 December, 10 a.m.: The spelling of Corneveagh Bog has been corrected throughout this article. On a cold, gray morning in November, the Corneveagh Bog in central Ireland is a scene of industrial harvest. Like other Irish bogs, it has been drained and stripped of its moss and heather to reveal the rich, black soil beneath: peat. The peat is scored with tread marks left by the machines that shaved off a crumbly layer and turned it over to dry. A long mound of peat, stripped and dried earlier in the season, is covered in plastic, waiting to be piled into rail cars and taken to a nearby power plant. There, the carbon-rich soil will be burned to generate electricity.But not for much longer, says Barry O’Loughlin, an ecologist employed by Bord na Móna, a state-owned peat harvesting and energy company based in Newbridge that owns Corneveagh Bog. Bord na Móna, which means “Peat Board,” will soon retire dozens of bogs like Corneveagh from energy production. Its team of four ecologists will rehabilitate many of them by blocking drains, soaking the ground, and reestablishing plant life, O’Loughlin says as his boots crunch through the frosty soil. “We bring life back into the bog again.”In Ireland, peat has been used for centuries to warm homes and fire whiskey distilleries. For a country with little coal, oil, and gas, peat—deep layers of partially decayed moss and other plant matter—is also a ready fuel for power plants. Peat power peaked in the 1960s, providing 40% of Ireland’s electricity. But peat is particularly polluting. Burning it for electricity emits more carbon dioxide than coal, and nearly twice as much as natural gas. In 2016, peat generated nearly 8% of Ireland’s electricity, but was responsible for 20% of that sector’s carbon emissions. “The ceasing of burning peat is a no-brainer,” says Tony Lowes, a founder of Friends of the Irish Environment in Eyeries. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Industrial peat extraction has stripped dozens of Irish bogs of their heather and moss. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Power from peat—more polluting than coal—is on its way out in Ireland KLAUS-WERNER FRIEDRICH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO last_img read more

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How a school of fish is like a rubber band

first_img By Adrian ChoMar. 6, 2019 , 8:00 AM Andriy Kotlyarov/shutterstock.com BOSTON—Physicists have long noted striking similarities between the movements of flocks of animals and the behavior of atoms and molecules. Now, one physicist has gone further and devised a way to measure the springiness and “temperature” of a school of fish. Such methods may aid physicists in their efforts to analyze flocks of animals as objects made of living “active matter.”To a physicist’s eye, hordes of animals often resemble inanimate physical systems in uncanny ways. For example, mackerel in a school tend to swim in the same direction, aligning their bodies to their neighbors much as iron atoms align their spins to make the metal magnetic. Similarly, a murmuration of starlings wheeling across the sky looks much like fluid droplets as they flow, stretch, and swirl in response to some unseen stirring (perhaps the wind).Such collective behavior arises not because of some grand design, but because each individual moves in response to the animals next to it. “Flocks are held together because the individuals are tracking their neighbors,” says Nigel Goldenfeld, a physicist at the University of Illinois in Urbana who was not involved in the new work. “They’re not paying any attention to the flock as a whole.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Describing a flock as a material system isn’t easy, however, because the individual interactions aren’t physical but social. Nevertheless, James Puckett, a physicist at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, and his students have found a way to measure material properties of a school of rummy-nose tetras (Hemigrammus rhodostomus), a freshwater tropical fish about 3.5 centimeters long that originated in South America. The tetras stick together but have no social hierarchy and avoid light, Aawaz Pokhrel, an undergraduate student working with Puckett told a meeting of the American Physical Society here on 4 March. That makes them ideal for group experiments. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country When stretched with light signals, rummy-nose tetra schools snap back like rubber bands thanks to purely social forces. To measure the school’s elasticity or springiness, Pokhrel placed 50 tetras in just a few centimeters of water in a large tank, so the fish could only swim horizontally. He shone a light from above, causing the fish to congregate in a square shadow about 25 centimeters wide in the center of the tank. Using computer controls, Pokhrel then split the shadow and moved the two halves apart. In response, the school of fish would stretch out until it suddenly snapped back, with fish darting to one shadow or the other. Pokhrel filmed it all using infrared light the fish cannot see. “Basically, the social forces overcome the external perturbation” of the light, Pokhrel says.Were the school the same as a simple spring, the rate at which the fish accelerate toward the center would increase in proportion with their distance from it. By tracking individual fish, Pokhrel found that, on average, that’s exactly what happened. From the data, he extracted the rate at which acceleration increases with distance—the spring constant—and found that a school of rummy-nose tetra is extremely elastic: Stretch it a given amount and it pulls back with only about one–ten-thousandth the force of a rubber band.Similarly, Julia Giannini, a graduate student at Syracuse University in New York—who until recently worked with Puckett—reported a way to measure an effective “temperature” of a school of tetras. In an ordinary material, temperature is a measure of the average energy of the constituent atoms or molecules.Using the tank, she confined 50 or 100 tetras in a circular shadow about 30 centimeters in radius and then shrank the circle at different speeds, causing the fish to crowd together. Using infrared tracking, she tallied the density of fish in the shadow. Using the individual fishes’ speeds, she calculated a quantity analogous to pressure. Just as with a volume of gas, the pressure increased in proportion to the density. And the constant of proportionality, which depends on the speed at which the circle shrinks, then plays the role of temperature, Giannini told the meeting. A fast-shrinking circle, for example, leads to “hotter” fish. Thus, the school of tetras acts like a gas with a constant, well-defined temperature.The goal of such work is to describe the dynamics of a school of fish or flock of birds using its macroscopic “material” properties, without tracking the individual animals, Puckett says. Just how far you can push the materials analogy remains unclear, he acknowledges. For example, in thermodynamics, when gases of two different temperatures mix, they equilibrate at a common intermediate temperature. It’s not clear whether that would happen with the fish—or even how you could do that experiment, Giannini says.The work has a lot of promise, Goldenfeld says. “They’ve got a way of doing controlled experiments that you can’t do with starlings,” he says. He adds that the work is still in its infancy, but after the talks, Goldenfeld buttonholed Puckett and his team to talk about a possible collaboration. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) How a school of fish is like a rubber band Emaillast_img read more

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